top of page

90 Ergebnisse gefunden für „“

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Animal Maximalism

    Top of Page HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ANIMAL MAXIMALISM GREEN KILL 229 Greenkill Ave. kingston, NY October 1-15, 2016 Opening Reception: Saturday October 1, 5:PM-8:PM www.greenkill.org Animal Maximalism is a hyperactive schizophrenic super-destroying maximalist art show that functions as homeopathic immersion therapy for highly sensitive people (HSP) and a lullaby for all others. Sound, video, performance, painting, photography, music, and sculpture are combined into a simultaneous experience in an attempt to exercise the human sensory input manifold. Elements of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project, The Windmill Weapon Matron, The Entity and Constituents, The Giant Candle, Fun Times! , and C O D E, as well as multiple abstract paintings, and photographs were included in the exhibit.. Videos presented were Certain Solutions For Dissolving Problems, Double-Slit, The Ax In The Stump , and The Locational Trauma Transforming Trap , among others. Performances included new work by International performance artist and musician Marita Isobel Solberg, Dirt Boy, who used buckets of dirt to perform an earthmoving action called $ouls for $ale- $1 Million Buckets of Dirt , Clara Diamond reconstituted the constituents of The Entity , and dancer Lucie Parker moved through nonspecific space performing a deconstructed ballet. Musical performance by Bitty Holly Hannah and Simon Ampel of Sighanide was part of the exhibit, as well as Interactive opportunities including A Course in Miracles and Other Unlabeled Alcohol To Be Drunk and The Fuck Trump Pot Luck . ​ DIRT BOY is a rouge spirit. This cloaked being wanders the earth sculpting the terrain to suit his strange visions in order to transcend the dimension of violence and suffering. In 2109 Dirt Boy successfully converted the earth to use the non-linear peace dimension in which time does not exist. He has decided to demonstrate his earth moving capabilities in order to bring entertainment and wonder to those still stuck in the dimension of time, violence, and suffering. ​ CLARA DIAMOND is a performance artist working with impermanence, degeneration, and transformation, seeking to challenge the notion of impermanence by presenting “art objects” such as the body, action, experience, memory, and story. Clara’s process often incorporates tactile elements such as plaster, earth, and wax to wrap, coat, or layer the physical body within a temporary installation environment. Using text features such as books, signs and spoken words, as well as thematic or narrative work cycles, Clara exploits symbols, stories, physical space, and other subtle notions of relationships. A persistent theme of object-making as performance runs through her work, resulting in the manifestation of inconsequential art-objects or garbage, which drives the procession of narrative across related pieces. ​ http://www.starhousegallery.com/#!clara-diamond/h79q5 ​ NINA ISABELLE is a multidisciplinary artist working with abstract painting, performance, video, photography, and sculpture. Her background also includes alternative process photography and modern dance. She identifies with Maximalism and Action Art, embracing the concepts of “too much” and “more is more.” Nina pushes material and information past the point of recognition in a way that forces a shift in meaning, reveling new information that can transform and challenge the limits of materials, perception, and belief. Sensory input is deconstructed to the extent that meaning becomes shifted and interpretations become a phenomena of psychic imprint. Her work often references the inability of communication which is used to visualize reality, the failure of dialogue, the dissonance between form and content, as well as the shortcomings of literal language. Nina is the Director of Star House Gallery & Studio in Kingston, NY where she practices as a studio artist and gallery director curating group shows featuring abstract artists. In the past year she has participated in the Upstate Vignette Video Project II with F.A.G (Feminist Art Group) from Brooklyn at Rosekill, performed at Panoply Performance Lab in Brooklyn as well as at The Linda Mary Montano Art / Life Institute in Kingston. Her work has been exhibited at Czong Institute for Contemporary Art (CICA) Museum in Gimpo, Korea as well as in The New School’s Social Justice Show at The Bushwick Collective. She is currently a contributor to The Jurnquist Coloringbook show by Honey McMoney at Studio Fidlär in Berlin, her film Mother vs. God will be shown at The San Diego Art Institute in October, and in January 2016 Nina was interviewed by the International Art Publication, ArticulAction Special Issue. ​ www.ninaisabelle.com ​ LUCIE PARKER is a multidisciplinary artist studying modern dance, martial arts, photography, visual art, and theatre. Lucie is a student of Hudson Valley Sudbury School and lives in Kingston, NY. ​ SIGHANIDE is what happens when feral backwoods Appalachia meets bluesy city rhythm. With Bitty Holly Hannah sculpting out melancholy songs and Simon Ampel, on drums, executing the rhythm. Outside of Sighanide, Bitty is a multi-disciplinary artist and student, focused on the study of healing religious trauma through art. Simon is an animated film-maker enraptured with drawing movement and memory. Both hailing from their own mountains, they found one another in the midst of Brooklyn's madness. ​ https://www.facebook.com/sighanidekids/?fref=ts ​ MARA AKA MARITA ISOBEL SOLBERG is an international performance artist, musician, and visual artist from Tromsø and Manndalen, Norway. She is working in the borderline between art, life and science, focusing mainly on sound, performance art and installation. Experimenting with different medias in her work and interweaving elements from the surroundings, Solberg’s work is often site-specific and relational, reinforced by a strong performative tension. The works explore a world of challenge, strangeness, melancholy and desire sometimes with narrative passages or content, mixing with more symbolic and ritual elements. ​ http://www.maritaisobelsolberg.virb.com ​ THE WINDMILL WEAPON MATRON ​ Dimensions: 90h x 53w x 45d Materials: Sawhorse, Lumber, Construction Materials, Spray Paint, House Paint, Afghans, Weapons, Bicycle Parts, Yarn, Plaster, Terra Cotta, Chain. Date: May 12, 2016 The Windmill Weapon Matron is a dangerous female machine expressing an active stance and aggressive posture. She no longer identifies as passive and has most recently emerged as an international threat. Based on a jumbled compilation of afghans, defunct bicycle parts, weapons, lumber, and chain her biographical narrative has been holographically reconfigured into a destructive biological machine made of woman’s time. While The Windmill Weapon Matron acknowledges her destructive approach as a natural response to her capacity for childbirth, she hesitates to dichotomize the two simply saying “Come, let me destroy you.” Utilizing a process of defiance The Windmill Weapon Matron has successfully developed a system capable of transforming eye-rolling, financial aid application trauma, stuffed animal over population, and hair pulling as well as other sensory input bull shit into a clean, renewable, and sustainable energy source for mothers. Nobody will lend her a chainsaw, it’s safe to breed with her. She makes a mockery of science, her system is nervous. Her face is spinning. When she was a virgin politicians killed and ate her, she is secular. Her system has calcified. She loves The Antichrist, she birthed a female bastard. She wan’t trained up the way she should go. The system tries to destroy her. She has nothing to depart from, rabbits fear her. She has been relieved of advantage. Her system is unkillable. THE Q:ENTITY AND Q:INFORMATICUS Clara Diamond / Nina Isabelle Q:Informaticus, a division of The Q:Entity Corporation, is designed to generate constituents as information receptacles programmed to solve unreal and/or otherworldly problems. Q:Informaticus directs functional information along proper dispersal channels activating the psychic conduits of multiple physical bodies. Activation originates at the coccyx and rises through the spine while keeping operational residence within the instinctive functioning portions of the guts, heart, and brain meat, matter, fluid, and circuitry using complex interlaced bacteria and neuroelectric pathways programmed to transmit and receive local and non-local information. The sensory input perception manifolds within all programmed constituents will evolve and transform comfortably to reduce validation of information received through the physical portals known as eyeballs, tongue, ears, and skin. Alternative modalities of perception will be established and activated. Q: Informaticus: for people who want to solve unreal and / or otherworldly problems. There are few career paths, be it scientific research, business, design, medicine, the fine arts, or telecommunications, in which Q won't play an important part of your work. Healthcare specialists use Q records to help diagnose disease and discover new ways of treating patients. Advertising firms use Q data to create visualizations of customer behavior. Environmental scientists compile big Q data to track the impact of climate change. Smartphones are awash with Q apps that can do everything from pay your bills to find the next band you might like. All of those applications and much more are Q: informaticus in action putting Q to work to solve complex problems. Utilizing Q: informaticus to study Q technology impacts academic disciplines in the science, arts, medicine, business, and telecommunications fields. Q is also one of the fastest growing fields in technology, and the demand is high. Last year alone, 88 percent of Q: informaticus constituents secured full-time employment within six months. Among students holding Master's degrees or a Ph.D., 98 percent accepted employment within six months of graduation. In a world of stagnating salaries, Q: informaticus constituents also enjoy an average salary. Q:Informaticus lays out a bright, flexible, structural path to a future and imparts valuable real-world experience and works side-by-side with some of the most innovative thinkers in the field. Q:Informaticus prepares, excites, severs programming, technologizes, and generates futures. THE SUPERFUND RE-VISIONING PROJECT ​ The Superfund Re-Visioning Project is an experimental artistic process that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are one hundred and seventeen Superfund Sites, this project will focus on transforming and energetically remediating those sites by redirecting potential energy toward alternate futures using combinations of photography, dance, video, song, sculpture, writing, and drawing. Superfund sites are polluted locations requiring a long-term response to clean up hazardous material and contaminations. CERCLA authorized the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create a list of such locations, which are placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). CERCLA stands for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, known also as Superfund. It was passed in 1980 in response to some alarming and decidedly unacceptable hazardous waste practices and management going on in the 1970s. While CERCLA and other Government agencies have been able to compile large lists, testing, and data their processes often lack resolve and are tremendously expensive. Environmental contaminations such as those found in many of the New York State Superfund Sites has been implicated as a possible factor contributing to global warming. ​ Three New York State Superfund sites have been preliminarily re-visioned In order to illustrate the process of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project and to function as examples for interested artists and community members to consider. The preliminary Superfund site re-visions include the Boices Lane Office Depot building in Kingston, NY., a defunct IBM Industrial Complex in Kingston, NY, and an archived Superfund site located in West Hurley, NY called Numrich Arms that has operated as a weapons and ammunition manufacturing facility. ​ 1. BOICES LANE OFFICE DEPOT The Office Depot Superfund Site has been re-visioned as a future bio dome for butterflies. Project Completion Date: 2816 State environmental officials have added the Boices Lane plaza where Office Depot used to operate to a list of Superfund sites that pose a threat to public health. The Department of Environmental Conservation, in a notification dated Oct. 21, said the contamination was found in an area of the property where there previously was a dry cleaner. “Based on investigations the primary contaminants of concern include tetrachlorethylene (PCE) and its degradation products in the groundwater, soil, soil vapor and/or indoor air,” the department wrote. 2. IBM / TECH CITY KINGSTON The archived IBM Superfund site has been re-visioned as a research and treatment center for those who have lost the ability to communicate telepathically. Project Completion Date: May 5, 4011 The condemned IBM / Tech City complex is a superfund site located along Neighborhood Rd in Kingston, NY. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as IBM / Tech City because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. IIBM is currently registered as an archived superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up action or further investigation at this time. 3. NUMRICH GUN PARTS CORPORATION Numrich Gun Parts Corporation has been re-visioned as the future archaeological dig site revealing artifacts that will implicate technologies role in the destruction of humans. Project Completion Date: May 5, 3016 Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is a weapons and ammunition manufacturing plant and distribution center located in West Hurley, NY. that had been investigated for lead contamination of nearby residential water wells. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as Numrich Gun Parts Corporation because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is currently registered as an archived Superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up, action, or further investigation at this time. The effectiveness of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project lies in its ability to utilize a combination of existing contaminated locations and factual documentation of specific contaminating factors in conjunction with fictional and ridiculous psychic predictions presented as fact in order to further blur the lines between science and belief and to challenge the validity of projected and legitimized possible future outcomes. In this way, The Superfund Re-Visioning Project shifts belief and science in a way that helps us recognize our own ridiculousness as a possible culprit. Ridiculous circumstances call for a ridiculous approach. Within The Superfund Re-Visioning Project, and specifically in the case of environmental contamination, levels of ridiculousness may indicate high probability of successful outcome. Because Earth's current level of environmental contamination and global warming are ridiculous, it is logical to conclude a solution based on ridiculousness. This is a creative artistic approach to shifting perception of science and logic. . VIDEO DESCRIPTIONS CERTAIN SOLUTIONS FOR DISSOLVING PROBLEMS VIDEO / 2:53 Nina Isabelle 2016 ​ Certain Solutions For Dissolving Problems compiles digital imagery, audio, photography, and writing from The Superfund Re-Visioning Project into a video that addresses the failure of language and processes used to confront social and political issues such as environmental contamination. Using subtle neurolinguistic programming tactics combined with inaudible frequencies this video implants the idea of psychic reprogramming as a possible solution to artistic process displacement and underutilized artistic visions within the financial and political structures intended to remediate environmental contamination. In September 2016 Certain Solutions for Dissolving Problems was included in an exhibition called Artist and Location at The Czong Institute For Contemporary Art in Gimpo, Korea. LOCATIONAL TRAUMA TRANSFORM VIDEO / WOVEN OBJECT 2:53 Nina Isabelle / Neva Isabelle 2016 Neva & Nina Isabelle construct a handwoven trauma trap using black silk and gymnastics chalk that is used to absorb and transform trauma located at 40.8987° N, 77.3561° W. THE GIANT CANDLE - ENVIRONMENTAL HEALING SPELL BY PROXY VIDEO / 2:43 Nina Isabelle 2016 The Giant Candle - Environmental Healing Spell By Proxy is a video spell designed as part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project. This video works remotely with an undisclosed location in Ulster County, NY that is the subject of industrial solvent contamination, death threats, labor rights violations, hauntings, and suicide by forklift. The Giant Candle burns by proxy to cleanse the location remotely. Voice- Brittany Holly Hannah / Dance- Lucie Parker. C O D E VIDEO / PAINTING 5:35 Nina Isabelle 2016 This work was made in response to Apple’s battle with the FBI over a federal order to unlock the iPhone of a mass shooter and looks at the differences between humans and machines, specifically ways information and data can be hidden or revealed by programming, intention, or choice. THE AX IN THE STUMP VIDEO / 3:16 Nina Isabelle 2016 The Ax in The Stump tells the story of Terror- as both a fabled horse from a North Indian Fairy Tale and the torture that can ride through family histories for generations. The video is directed by Nina Isabelle using a voiceover sampled from Ellen Vereniek narrating Magic Hoofbeats and an anonymous cast member. ​ MOTHER VS. GOD VIDEO / :47 NINA ISABELLE 2016 Mother vs. God is an experimental video that uses personal photographs combined with multiple sound tracks of digitally altered voice and electrified violin. The compilation of multiple media and input results in a distortion that parallels the dialogue that can exist between religious beliefs and psychotic delusions. In October 2016 Mother vs. God was chosen by Marilyn Manson’s Daisy Berkowitz, Scott Mitchell Putesky, as part of The San Diego Art Institute’s show The Dead Are Not Quiet. DOUBLE SLIT VIDEO / 1:01 Nina Isabelle 2016 Referencing the magical incantation “As above, so below” from Hermetic Alchemy and Thomas Young’s original Double-Slit Experiment from 1801, Double Slit asks- does science suggest that man’s actions on earth might parallel actions within infinite multiple invisible lateral physical dimensions? ​ ​

  • STAGES / Clara Diamond / Nina A. Isabelle /Valerie Sharp / GREENKILL

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... STAGES CLARA DIAMOND, NINA A. ISABELLE, & VALERIE SHARP GREEN KILL, KINGSTON, NY APRIL 15, 2017

  • Nina A. Isabelle // Multidisciplinary Artist // Kingston, NY

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... UMEWE HAPPY SPOT 2016 NAI_1988 http://www.intoyellow.com/ P&T Surplus Timothy J. Smythe at P&T Surplus in Kingston, NY. http://www.intoyellow.com/ Alexus, April, Qunisha Block Park in Kingston, NY http://www.intoyellow.com/ Ines & Domingo Santos Just For You Oaxacan Restaurant in Kingston, NY http://www.intoyellow.com/ Kuda & Quan First Capital Barber in Kingston, NY http://www.intoyellow.com/ Ever & Aaron At Rezny Photography Studio in Kingston, NY http://www.intoyellow.com/ Brian Buboltz American Legion Post 150 in Kingston, NY http://www.intoyellow.com/ Rosa The Happy Apple Thrift Shop in Kingston, NY http://www.intoyellow.com/ INT-O Yellow was developed as a collaboration between conceptual artist Riley Johndonnell, Pantone and UMEWE Inc.- an art and design collaborative founded by Whitny Sobala and Riley Johndonnell which supports, promotes and disseminates Optimistic 'tools' and works of public art. www.intoyellow.com ​ As a way to articulate with INT-O Yellow I photographed one of the INT-O Yellow Happy Spots around Mid Town Kingston. Happy Spot visited some classic Kingston locations, integrating the familiar with new faces and places. ​

  • AARON PIERCE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Aaron Pierce February 2017 ​ A: I am a graduate from Utah Valley University and I am writing a dissertation for the university's biannual Art History Symposium. The topic of discussion this year is Maximalism. I am particularly focusing on performance art as the contemporary medium that is reinventing museum spaces and engaging audiences by stimulating the senses more through music, dance, film, and painting combined. That is where your exhibit Animal Maximalism came to my attention. I am completely intrigued and enthralled by your performance art pieces and projects you have created. For this paper, I would love to have your view on performance art and Maximalism. I am interested in hearing some of your methods about performance art and Maximalism. It is rare in art history to be able to have contact with the artist, hence my excitement. If you do not mind sharing your opinion, I would like to know how you feel performance art engages audiences and pushes them to connect on a higher level to art? Also, why are we seeing a shift towards more performance art pieces in museums and galleries? I feel that audiences want to have a full sensory experience. How does Maximalist performance art achieve this better than other medium of art? ​ N: I practice a process of allowance where I let myself do what I want. This approach results in maximum data and action. By letting myself engage with an array of modalities I can generate multiple outcomes and possibilities. Because I'm not limited to any single mode of involvement, I'm free to use painting, performance, photography, or video or a mixture of modalities as I find necessary depending on my agenda and instinct. This suits my athletic, resourceful, and determined nature. ​ I approach performance art in the same way I would approach any other art modality- by paying close attention to gut instincts and psychic impressions in a process designed to override cerebral programming. The aim is always to align action with intention, and make note of the findings and outcome along the way. Performance art is a good choice when the concept I'm grappling with calls for a human body, action, or a narrative to actuate the outcome, especially literal concepts like worshiping the golden calf or using blood to cleanse things. My body can become a tool, a stand-in, or effigy of or for the viewer, creating a point of commonality to facilitate access. Aligning action with intention is also a way to re-frame ritual and an attempt to validate the effectiveness of approaches historically relegated to realms of religious structures and beliefs. I was recently invited to teach an art theory class for kids at The Hudson Valley Sudbury School. Through our discussions it emerged that the students felt most drawn to art practices and outcomes that suited the nature, mentality, and necessity of the individual artist. For instance they could relate to how Chuck Close became successful at painting faces as a result of his lifelong struggle with a facial recognition disorder. In reflecting on my personal method it occurs to me that my mode of operation is dictated by my nature, I didn't choose to function within the Maximalism approach and philosophy, it's just that the philosophy happens to align with my nature. I'm a serial over-doer of all things who relishes the opportunity to push things too far. My work is reactionary because I'm a reactionary person. For instance the first time I encountered minimalism I was ready to explode in a thousand directions. And, as an art student I couldn't help but challenge typical art professor's slogans such as "You have to know when to stop." Of course I could recognized the academically dictated stopping point but I would never in a million years stop there. I've always felt that learning how to challenge, push, or destroy something is a valid study when handled respectfully and with intention. ​ Performance art is an another mode of operating for artists to use in order to find or generate new information, to experiment with creating new experiences, or to try to express something they otherwise couldn't. It can engage the viewer in an intimate way offering the potential to build powerful experiences as it facilitates a space that can involve and include the viewer in a novel physical or psychic way. It's possible that since performance art inhabits walking space where gallery-goers would otherwise be moving about, a psychic connection is created by sharing the same space. As viewers, we know less about what it would be like to hang motionless on a wall. Performance art offers a platform for artists to practice aligning action with intention, a way to possibly re-frame ritual and to build experimental new models for of control or power to replace outmoded religious structures and beliefs. But also, It's possible the performance art trend might be a way for artists to backhandedly confront consumerism and elitism simultaneously, or at least to create the illusion of doing so. Commercial galleries and academic environments can be market driven or exclusive, but performance art has the ability to dissolve those traditional notions and to expand viewership by engaging broader mentalities in a way that would be difficult for strictly visual work focused on heady concepts or dollar amounts. And since we live in a culture of visual bombardment, where viewer's digitally conditioned eyes and minds are increasingly savvy, and in conjunction with consumer programming, we need something that can function both inside of and outside of commercial gallery and academic paradigms. There is a literal dissolution of boundaries. Since performance art is impervious to ownership and commodification, it pushes against market-driven capitalist structures and challenges a system where finances determine success. Issues of marketability, ownership, or commodity all come into play because its difficult to financially capitalize off of performance art. So, maybe it's like most trends- timely and culturally necessity. ​ I developed the Animal Maximalism exhibition concept as a way to bombard the human sensory input manifold with the intention of revealing cloaked information. I use the word "Animal" as an homage to instinct. For me academia operated through reversal, fueling my defiance more than refining me the way school is supposed to, so part of my mission has always been to build legitimate framework for us animals, one that is less cage-like, and Maximalism is a good framework for that agenda. I try to work within and build upon systems that already exist that might reflect and support my authentic nature, and to allow my work to reflect and be a response to the full spectrum of my body's biologic manifestation of its own history within its cultural environment. Maximalism feels like science-fiction, in that it offers the potential for system building where the inward personal landscape can travel all the way outward through the giant jumbled experience of collective household, community, country, and planetary psychic connections. Maybe performance offers an easier access point to the viewer in that we can all relate to each other as humans who are human shaped and have human form. We all share common ways of moving our human forms through space. It's possible that performance could function to create a portal, like a way out or a way in.

  • THE EUCHARIST MACHINE / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE EUCHARIST MACHINE BANGKOK UNDERGROUND FILM FESTIVAL BANGKOK, THAILAND / MARCH , 2017 English with Thai subtitles Thai with English subtitles Inspired by Chris Lehmann’s book The Money Cult: Capitalism, Christianity, and the Unmaking of The American Dream, The Eucharist Machine addresses language, perception, and belief. In The Eucharist Machine, information is skewed by a presentation of jumbled non-linear facts and fiction, science, pseudoscience, and science fiction. Inaccurate grammar and linguistics push the concept even further by incorporating the cockamayme Thai / English subtitles and voice-overs produced by Google Translate and Apple’s Text To Speech system preference in a process that reverse-legitimizes the information. The Eucharist Machine is what happens when the under informed articulate with high-tech features. Information lost in translation becomes a sort of up-cycled spirituality; a futuristic projection of possible renewal of the crumbling dialogue between spirituality, commodity, and financial value. The Eucharist Machine takes a serious, culturally backwards, multigenerational look at what it means to be sanctified. เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทเป็นหนังสั้นที่เขียนกำกับและแก้ไขโดยศิลปินนานาชาติ Nina อิสซาเบล แรงบันดาลใจจากหนังสือของคริสมาห์ของเงินลัทธิ: ทุนนิยมคริสต์และ Unmaking ของความฝันอเมริกันภาษาอยู่เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทการรับรู้และความเชื่อ ในศีลมหาสนิทเครื่องข้อมูลจะถูกบิดเบือนโดยการนำเสนอข้อเท็จจริงที่คลั่งไคล้ที่ไม่ใช่เชิงเส้นและนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ pseudoscience และนิยายวิทยาศาสตร์ ไวยากรณ์ไม่ถูกต้องและภาษาศาสตร์ผลักดันแนวคิดให้ดียิ่งขึ้นโดยผสมผสาน cockamayme คำบรรยายภาษาไทย / ภาษาอังกฤษและเสียงพากย์ผลิตโดย Google Translate และข้อความของ Apple เพื่อการตั้งค่าระบบเสียงพูดในกระบวนการที่ย้อนกลับ legitimizes ข้อมูล เครื่องศีลมหาสนิทเป็นสิ่งที่เกิดขึ้นเมื่ออยู่ภายใต้แจ้งปล้องที่มีคุณสมบัติที่มีเทคโนโลยีสูง ข้อมูล Lost in Translation กลายเป็นจัดเรียงของขึ้นกรณืจิตวิญญาณ; การฉายอนาคตของการต่ออายุเป็นไปได้ของการเจรจาบี้ระหว่างจิตวิญญาณสินค้าโภคภัณฑ์และความคุ้มค่าทางการเงิน ศีลมหาสนิทเครื่องยิงร้ายแรงวัฒนธรรมย้อนหลังดูหลายรุ่นว่ามันหมายถึงความบริสุทธิ์

  • THREE PHASE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THREE PHASE 3607 ATWOOD RD. STONE RIDGE, NY email: threephasecenter@gmail.com ​ www.threephasecenter.com Three Phase Canter is a space for organizing collaborative art research and perception building situations through presenting projects and workshops designed to stimulate the types of community and dialogue that generate and build new possibilities and outcomes. . Located in Stone Ridge, NY Three Phase is a place to formulate, find, construct, propose and articulate with information derived from process-based art actions, object construction, performance, experimentation and outcomes. Three Phase is dedicated to supporting and reframing the utility of art practices that aim to sort and solve problems of language and perception by offering an array of workshops, services, studio & lab time as well as space for performance art, movement and sound exploration. ​ Three Phase Center is a Woman-led organization - conceived, owned & operated by Nina Isabelle.

  • MOSS ROCK CAGE | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... MOSS ROCK CAGE April 2020 Moss covered rock welded into hand-bent steel cage sold for a fundraising effort for HiLo Art in Catskill, NY during the pandemic.

  • Multidisciplinary Artist | New York | Nina A. Isabelle

    Nina Isabelle HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Addition Equals Subtraction, 43.50 x 62.25, house paint and flashe on canvas, 2017 Nina A Isabelle performing in Temporary Ungovernable Zone for Anarko Art Lab at Ft. Tilden, NYC. Photo by Jaime Rosenfeld RECENT / CURRENT / UPCOMING - 5 Objects, Percussion & Piano for Lisa Schonberg's Old Growth Playback at The Sanctuary for Independent Media in Troy, NY on December 16th, 2023 at 7:PM - Electronic Arts PhD Open Studios, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY - Chicken Performance with Linda Montano, Paul McMahon & Brian McCorkle at Lamb Center, Saugerties, NY - Art = Healing - group exhibit by Linda Montano at Emerge Gallery, Saugerties, NY - b priori , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute EArts PhD Graduate Exhibit at Collarworks , Troy, NY - SOLVERMATH! Initial phase opens virtually February 24, 2023, CLICK HERE > > > SOLVERMATH! - West Hall Open Studios , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute , Troy, NY, December 2022 - Livestream - Nina Isabelle & Adriana Magaña at Jennifer Zackin's Upstate Art Open Studio, July 2022 - Building as Being / Construction as Performance - IV Castellanos & Nina Isabelle at Rosekill Performance Art Farm, June 2021 -Nina Isabelle - Artist, Thinker, Observer , Theresa Widman's Podcast #183 - The Black Meta Interviews Nina Isabelle for Radio Kingston, by Beetle & Freedom Walker, May 2021 - PSYCHIC SELF-DEFENSE S culpture, Installation, & Demonstration at Art/Life Kingston, May 1st - 29th, 2021 -Imagined Performances read by IV Castellanos at Para\\el Performance Space, Brooklyn, NY, February 12, 202 1 - Kerry Santullo interviews Nina Isabelle for NYC Children's Museum of Art "Meet The Makers ," October 21, 2020 -Spheres of Perception & Value, Virtual Presentation, Hynes Institute for Entrepre neurship & Innovation at Iona College , September 21, 2020 -Video Manifestation System User Interface Lecture and Presentation , Grace Exhibition Space, NYC , May 1, 2020 -Superfund Revisioning Project Lecture, Grace Exhibition Space, NYC . May 15, 2020 -EQUINOX , An Emergency of Joy, March 19, 2020 -The Ear , Brooklyn, NY, August 23, 2019 -Remarkable New Locations - Nye Ffarrabas & Nina Isabelle, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, May 18th - June 15th, 2019 - PARALLEL -104 Meserole Street, Brooklyn NY, Saturday, March 23rd,2019- 7:PM -documentation discussion panel with LiVEART.US featuring Emergency INDEX at Queens Museum , February 17, 2019 2:00-5:00 -Emp athy Blinders by David Ian Bellows/Griess with Nina Isabelle & Elizabeth Lamb, Brooklyn Arts Media , December 4-18, 2018 -As Far As The Hart Can See / In Honor of , The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts , NYC, October 20th, 2018 -actLife , Linda Mary Montano, Nye Ffarrabas, Cai Xi, Nina Isabelle, Jennifer Zackin, Lee Xi & Sharon Myers, CX Silver Gallery, Brattleboro, VT, August 24 -Healing + Arts / Radical Domesticity, Movement Metaphors Workshop, Kingston, NY, August 24, 2018 -NO NUDES NO SUNSETS , August 11 - September 22, 2018, Green County Council on the Arts , Catskill, NY -Whistle Portraits, Linda Montano & Nina Isabelle, Secret City Art Revival, Woodstock, NY, July 28 - DRAMATIC OBJECT MAKING / EMPATHY BLINDERS with Elizabeth Lamb & David Ian Bellows Griess, THREE PHASE , Sept.1, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY - WE CAN'T TELL WHAT WE'RE DOING, HiLo , July 20, 2018 - August 26, 2018, Catskill, NY -Whistle Portraits , Linda Mary Montano, Nina Isabelle & Jennifer Zackin, HiLo, Catskill, NY June 10, 2018 -ANIMALIA , Anarchist Art Festival, Judson Memorial Church, NYC, June 8 2018 -GUTTER HANGER w/ Lorene Bouboushian & Friends, THREE PHASE , 1:PM-DARK, May 27, 2018, Stone Ridge, NY - EMBODYING THE OUTER BODIES: a demonstration of low-level energetic vacuum form technologies 7:PM, May 24, 2018, PPL , Brooklyn, NY - Citizen Participation: Diagrams & Directives , Feminist Art Group, www.bulletspace.org , May 6, 2018, NYC -Hymn Warp Transducer at Paul McMahon' s Bedstock Exhibit, 9 Herkimer Place, Brooklyn, NY, April 15, 2018 -New Genres at Living Arts in Tulsa,OK , March 2-3, 2018 -MUSCULAR BONDING at M.A.R.S.H. (Materializing and Activating Radical Social Habitus)- Feb 15 - March 5, St. Louis, MO -The Video Manifestation System released by Human Trash Dump - February 26, 2018 -PIANO PORTRAITS By Linda Mary Montano with Nina Isabelle, & Jennifer Zackin at HiLo , Catskill, NY, Feb. 11, 2018 -BEAST CONJURING by Nina Isabelle , The Mothership , Woodstock, NY, Jan16-21, 2018 http://paulmcmahon.tv/mothership -MKUVM , Human Trash Dump, November 27, 2017 https://archive.org/details/htdc002 -The Bedroom , 4th Iteration by The Women Artist Team, Holland Tunnel Gallery , Brooklyn, NY , October 20- November 12 -Patricia Field's International Art / Fashion Show , Joe's Garage, October 6, 2017, Catskill, NY www.greenearts.org -CENTENNIAL:SHE , Greene County Council on the Arts, October 7 - November 11, 2017 - The Shirt Factory Centennial Celebration- Performance / Open Studio , Kingston, NY, September 16, 2017 -F.A.G. Slumber Party , Nina's House & Yard Studio, Hurley, NY September 4-6, 2017 - We Are The Secret Garden: An Evening of Performance, Kingston, NY September 26, 2017 - The Bedroom , The Women Artist Team at NA Gallery, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea, July 23- Aug. 7, 201 7 -Just Situations , Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY, July 23, 2017 https://justsituations.wordpress.com -Temporary Ungovernable Zone , Anarcho Art Lab / ARTINYC, Ft. Tilden, NY July 8, 2017 -Experimental Archery Workshop , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 10, 2017 http://www.rosekill.com - Mothering , Rosekill Performance Art Farm, Rosendale, NY, June 3, 2017 http://www.rosekill.com/ - N Y C Anarchist Performance Art Festival #11 , The Judson Memorial Church , NYC, May 12, 2017 -The Fabric Of Women's Space-Time , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingsotn, NY, May 13, 2017 - UNITY , The Lace Mill Gallery, Kingston, N, May 6-13, 2017 -The Unstitute's Projection Room ,Catalunya, Spain, August 2017, http://www.theunstitute.org/Projection.Room.html - STAGES , Performance by Clara Diamond with Valerie Sharp & Nina Isabelle, GREENKILL , APRIL 15, 2017 -P R O P E R T Y , R O M A N S U S A N / RPWRHS, CHICACO, IL, APRIL 1-30, 2017, www.romansusan.org - Bangkok Underground Film Festival , Bridge Art Space, Bangkok, Thailand, March 4-12, 2017 -SHORTCUT TO HELL , January 22, 2017, Otion Front Studio, Brooklyn, NY www.otionfront.com -HiLo Art , April 2017, Catskill, NY https://www.hilocatskill.com -EotW (Embarrassed Of The Whole) February 4, 2017, Panoply Lab, Brooklyn, NY http://www.panoplylab.org -Mock The Chasm, November 12, 2016, Art/Life Institute Kingston, NY http://www.artlifekingston.com/ -JOB /// IV Soldier's Feminist Art Group at Panoply Performance Lab, Brooklyn, NY -San Diego Art Institute - The Dead Are Not Quiet , San Diego, CA October 1-31 -Animal Maximalism , Green Kill, Kingston, NY, October 1-15 www.greenkill.org -POLITRICKS: Theories & Other Conspiracies , October 14, Ellipsis Art, Philadelphia, PA -Artist and Location , September 23-October 9, Czong Institute For Contemporary Art, Gimpo Korea, www.cicamuseum.com -Jurnquist Coloring Book Show , September 24, Studio Fidlär, Alexanderplatz, Berlin

  • Nina A. Isabelle // The Sperfund Revising Project

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... SUPERFUND RE-VISIONING PROJECT 2016 The Superfund Re-Visioning Project is an experimental artistic process that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are one hundred and seventeen Superfund Sites. This project focuses on transforming and energetically remediating those sites by redirecting potential energy toward alternate futures using combinations of creative actions including site specific performance and sound explorations, sculpture, writing, and visual art including drawing, painting, photography, and video. Superfund sites are polluted locations requiring a long-term response to clean up hazardous material and contaminations. CERCLA authorized the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create a list of such locations, which are placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). CERCLA stands for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, known also as Superfund. It was passed in 1980 in response to some alarming and decidedly unacceptable hazardous waste practices and management going on in the 1970s. While CERCLA and other Government agencies have been able to compile large lists, testing, and data, their processes often lack resolve and can be prohibitively expensive. Environmental contaminations such as those found in many of the New York State Superfund Sites have been implicated as a possible factor contributing to global warming. Three New York State Superfund sites have been preliminarily re-visioned In order to illustrate the process of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project and to function as examples for interested artists and community members to consider. The preliminary Superfund site re-visions include the Boices Lane Office Depot building in Kingston, NY., the former IBM Industrial Complex in Kingston, NY, and an archived Superfund site located in West Hurley, NY called Numrich Arms that operated as a weapons and ammunition manufacturing facility. IBM / Tech City Re-Vision September 2016 - This Video is part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project and works directly with the archived superfund site located at the IBM Tech City Industrial Complex location in Kingston, NY. Dance- Lucie Parker ​ ​ The Superfund Re-Visioning Project offers users an effective format to develop new personal and social systems of change that sidestep outmoded financial, political, industrial, and institutional systems. The effectiveness of The Superfund Re-Visioning Project lies in its ability to incorporate reflexive, intuitive, and instinctive responses, informed through creative processes, that can direct psychic energy towards creating beneficial shifts in physical locations. ​ Re-visioning processes give us the ability to alter physical locations and remediate factors, such as environmental contamination, in profound ways that can redirect the future of our planet. By engaging in practices that facilitate access to nonlinear spacetime, we can collect data from both past and future timelines to inform realtime re-visioning. Once locational re-vision occurs, physical action performed (on location or remotely) permanently anchors the re-visioned Superfund site firmly within a newly formed multilocational dimension of spacetime and possibilities. ​ To date, three NY State Superfund Sites have been re-visioned. Planning is currently underway to further the development of this project. Please contact Nina Isabelle at nina@ninaisabelle.com to learn about opportunities to engage. ​ ​ CURRENT SITE REVISIONS INCLUDE: 1. BOICES LANE OFFICE DEPOT The Office Depot Superfund Site has been re-visioned as a future bio dome for butterflies. Project Scope: May 5, 2016 - May 5, 2816 State environmental officials have added the Boices Lane plaza where Office Depot used to operate to a list of Superfund sites that pose a threat to public health. The Department of Environmental Conservation, in a notification dated Oct. 21, said the contamination was found in an area of the property where there previously was a dry cleaner. “Based on investigations the primary contaminants of concern include tetrachlorethylene (PCE) and its degradation products in the groundwater, soil, soil vapor and/or indoor air,” the department wrote. 2. IBM / TECH CITY KINGSTON The archived IBM Superfund site has been re-visioned as a research and treatment center for those who have lost the ability to communicate telepathically. Project Scope: May 5, 2016 - May 5, 4011 The condemned IBM / Tech City complex is a superfund site located along Neighborhood Rd in Kingston, NY. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as IBM / Tech City because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. IIBM is currently registered as an archived superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up action or further investigation at this time. 3. NUMRICH GUN PARTS CORPORATION Numrich Gun Parts Corporation has been re-visioned as the future archaeological dig site revealing artifacts that will implicate technologies role in the destruction of humans. Project Scope: May 5, 2016 - May 5, 3016 Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is a weapons and ammunition manufacturing plant and distribution center located in West Hurley, NY. that had been investigated for lead contamination of nearby residential water wells. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies sites such as Numrich Gun Parts Corporation because they pose or had once posed a potential risk to human health and/or the environment due to contamination by one or more hazardous wastes. Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is currently registered as an archived Superfund site by the EPA and does not require any clean up, action, or further investigation at this time. The Giant Candle - Environmental Healing Spell Burns By Proxy September 2016 - The Giant Candle Environmental Healing Spell By Proxy is a video spell designed as part of The Superfund Re-visioning Project. This video works remotely with an undisclosed location in Ulster County, NY that is the subject of industrial solvent contamination, death threats, labor rights violations, hauntings, and suicide by forklift. The Giant Candle burns by proxy to cleanse the location remotely. Voice- Brittany Holly Hannah / Dance- Lucie Parker. LIST OF NEW YORK STATE SUPERFUND SITES (from https://www.epa.gov/superfund/search-superfund-sites-where-you-live ) ​ 1. American Thermostat Co., Greene NY The American Thermostat Co. site is located in South Cairo, New York. Thermostat manufacturing for small appliances led to volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in the ground water. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201350 2. Griffiss Air Force Base, Oneida NY The Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB) site is located in Rome, New York. The 3,552-acre base began operations in 1943 under the Air Combat Command and served as home to various Air Force operations over the years. On July 1, 1970, the 416th Bombardment Wing of the Strategic Air Command was activated with the mission of maintenance and implementation of both effective air refueling operations and long-range bombardment capability, but in 1993 and 1995, Griffiss AFB was designated for realignment under the Base Realignment and Closure Act which resulted in the deactivation of the 416th Bombardment Wing in September 1995. While active base operations have now ceased and been relocated to other areas across the county, the Rome Laboratory, Northeast Air Defense Sector and the Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS) still operate at the base. During the 50 years of operation, hazardous wastes were generated from various activities including: aircraft operation; testing and maintenance; firefighting exercises; discharge of munitions; landfill operations; and research and development activities. Over the years, these wastes were disposed of in landfills and dry wells located across the base which led to investigations into contamination that could pose threats to public health and the environment. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202438 ​ 3. Love Canal, Niagara NY The Love Canal site (Site) is located in Niagara Falls, New York. It was one of two initial excavations in what was to be a canal to provide inexpensive hydroelectric power for industrial development around the turn of the 20th century. The abandoned excavation, partially filled with water, was used largely for recreational purposes. The canal was about 9,750 feet long and ranged in depth from 10 to 25 feet. Hooker Chemicals & Plastics Corporation (now Occidental Chemical Corporation, or OXY) disposed of over 21,000 tons of hazardous chemicals into the abandoned Love Canal between 1942 and 1953, contaminating soil and groundwater. In 1953, the landfill was covered and leased to the Niagara Falls Board of Education (NFBE). Afterwards, the area near the covered landfill was extensively developed, including construction of an elementary school, as well as many residential properties. The fenced 70-acre Site includes the original 16-acre hazardous waste landfill and a 40-acre cap, as well as a drainage system and leachate collection and treatment system that are in place and operating. ​ Beginning in the 1970s, local residents noticed foul odors and chemical residues and experienced increased rates of cancer and other health problems. In 1978 and 1980, President Carter declared two federal environmental emergencies for the Site, and about 950 families were evacuated from their homes within a 10-square-block area surrounding the landfill. This area was eventually referred to as the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) and was subsequently divided into seven areas as related to habitability concerns. The severity of the Site’s contamination ultimately led to the creation of federal legislation to manage the disposal of hazardous waste. This legislation was named the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Law) of 1980. In September 1983, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) listed the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) and began to work with New York State (NYS) to clean up the Site. In 1999, the EPA and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) completed remedy construction in 1999. The EPA deleted the Site from the NPL in 2004. As a result of the extent of the contamination at the Site, the response action was addressed in several stages focused on landfill containment with leachate collection; treatment and disposal; excavation and treatment of the sewer and creek sediment and other wastes; cleanup of the 93rd Street School soils; the purchase, maintenance and rehabilitation of properties; and, other short-term cleanup actions. As a result of these cleanup actions, the Site no longer presents a threat to human health and the environment. In September 2004, the EPA removed the Site from the Superfund program’s NPL. As a result of the revitalization efforts of the Love Canal Area Revitalization Agency (LCARA), new homeowners have moved into the habitable areas of the Love Canal. More than 260 formerly abandoned homes in the affected area were rehabilitated and sold to new residents, creating a viable new neighborhood. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201290 ​ 4. Hudson River PCBs, Washington, NY ​ General Electric's pollution of the Hudson River with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between 1947 and 1977 is the major historic contamination of the Hudson River Valley. This pollution caused a range of harmful effects to wildlife and people who eat fish from the river or drink the water. In response to this contamination, activists protested in various ways. Musician Pete Seeger founded the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and the Clearwater Festival to draw attention to the problem. The activism led to the site being designated as one of the superfund sites. Other kinds of pollution, including mercury contamination and sewage dumping, have also caused problems. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollution_of_the_Hudson_River ​ 5. Onondaga Lake Onondaga, NY ​ Onondaga Lake is a lake in Central New York located northwest of Syracuse, New York. The southeastern end of the lake and the southwestern shore abut industrial areas and expressways; the northeastern shore and northwestern end border a series of parks and museums.[1] Onondaga watershed Although it is near the Finger Lakes region, it is not traditionally counted as one of the Finger Lakes. Onondaga Lake is a dimictic lake,[2] meaning that the lake water completely mixes from top to bottom twice a year. The lake is 4.6 miles long and 1 mile wide making a surface area of 4.6 square miles.[2] The maximum depth of the lake is 63 feet with an average depth of 35 feet.[3] Its drainage basin has a surface area of 642 square kilometers, encompassing Syracuse, Onondaga County except the eastern and northern edges, the southeastern corner of Cayuga County and the Onondaga Nation Territory,[4] and supports approximately 450,000 people.[5] Onondaga Lake has two natural tributaries that contribute approximately 70% of the total water flow to the lake. These tributaries are: Ninemile Creek and Onondaga Creek. The Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant (METRO) contributes 20% of the annual flow.[3][6] No other lake in the United States receives as much of its inflow as treated wastewater.[7] The other tributaries, which include Ley Creek, Bloody Brook, Harbor Brook, Sawmill Creek, Tributary 5A, and East Flume, contribute the remaining 10% of water flow into the lake.[3][6] The tributaries flush the lake out about four times a year.[5] Onondaga Lake is flushed much more rapidly than most other lakes.[6] The lake flows to the northwest[8] and discharges into Seneca River which combines with the Oneida River to form the Oswego River, and ultimately ends up in Lake Ontario.[2] The lake is considered sacred within the indigenous territory of the Onondaga Nation. The Onondaga people lost control of the lake to New York State following the American Revolutionary War. During the late 19th century, European-Americans built many resorts along the lake's shoreline, as it was a destination of great beauty. The Onondaga Nation still has religious and cultural on the Shores of the Lake today. With the industrialization of the region, much of the lake's shoreline was developed; domestic and industrial waste, due to industry and urbanization, led to the severe degradation of the lake. Unsafe levels of pollution led to the banning of ice harvesting as early as 1901. In 1940, swimming was banned, and in 1970 fishing was banned due to mercury contamination.[2][5] Mercury pollution is still a problem for the lake today.[3] Despite the passage of the Clean Water Act in 1973 and the closing of the major industrial polluter in 1986, Onondaga Lake is still one of the most polluted lakes in the United States. Several initiatives, including a 15-year multi-stage program currently under way, have been recently[when?] undertaken to clean up the lake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onondaga_Lake 6. Pfohl Brothers Landfill, Erie, NY (REMOVED) ​ The Pfohl Brothers Landfill site is located in Cheektowaga, New York, approximately one mile east of the Buffalo Niagara International Airport. The privately-owned landfill received municipal and industrial waste between 1932 and 1971. After the cleanup of the site, EPA took it off of the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2008. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201751 7. Applied Environmental Services, Nassau, NY ​ The Applied Environmental Services site, also known as the Shore Realty site, is located in Glenwood Landing, New York. Petrochemical facility operations contaminated site soil and groundwater. Short-term cleanups, also known as removal actions, included drum and fencing removal and liquid waste collection. Long-term cleanup – soil vapor extraction for contaminated soils and a pump-and-treat system with bioremediation for contaminated groundwater – is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202121 8. Seneca Army Depot, Seneca, NY The Seneca Army Depot Activity (SEDA) site is located in Romulus, New York. It covers 10,587 acres. The U.S. Army has operated the facility and stored and disposed of military explosives there between 1941 and 2000, when SEDA closed. Following recommendation by DoD, approval by the Base Closure Commission, the President and Congress, SEDA was approved for the 1995 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) list in October 1995. Some parts of the base have been transferred to various entities, prison and correctional authorities, as well as the Local Redevelopment Authority (LRA). Current reuse plans project that most of the site property will be transferred for wildlife conservation, recreation, industrial and warehousing land uses. The site is being addressed through a Federal Facility Agreement between the Army, EPA and the State of New York. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing and it is expected to be completed in 2017. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202425 9. Black River PCBs Jefferson, NY The Black River PCBs site is located along the Black River in Champion, Carthage and West Carthage in Jefferson County, New York. The site is currently delineated as a three mile stretch of the Black River. The site consists of PCB-contaminated sediment that was a result of historical industrial discharges, and, at least in part, from wastewater discharged from the Carthage/West Carthage Water Pollution Control Facility, a sewage treatment plant. EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. EPA is currently investigating site conditions. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0206296 ​ 10. Dewey Loeffel Landfill, Rensselaer, NY The Dewey Loeffel Landfill Superfund site is located in Rensselaer County, New York. In the 1950s and 1960s, site was used as a disposal facility for more than 46,000 tons of industrial hazardous wastes, including solvents, waste oils, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), scrap materials, sludges and solids. Some hazardous substances, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PCBs, have migrated from the facility to underlying aquifers and downstream surface water bodies, resulting in contamination of groundwater, surface water, sediments and several species of fish. There is currently a fish consumption advisory for Nassau Lake and the surrounding water bodies. Site investigations are underway to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and inform the development of permanent cleanup options for the site. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201218 ​ 11. Hudson Technologies, Inc., Rockland, NY The Hudson Technologies, Inc. (HTI) site is located in Hillburn, New York. The 3-acre site was the location of a freon recycling facility. HTI’s activities at the facility included purifying spent refrigerant and returning it to customers. HTI began operations at the site in June 1994. Facility operations and spills contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. The site is being addressed through state actions. If HTI does not carry out cleanup activities, as specified, in the state enforcement agreement, EPA would finalize the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) and begin the Superfund site cleanup process. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204251 12. Newtown Creek, Kings and Queens, NY On September 7, 2011, an agreement was reached between EPA and Phelps Dodge Refining Corporation, Texaco Inc., BP products North America, Brooklyn Union Gas Company d/b/a National Grid NY, ExxonMobil Oil Corporation, and, The City of New York to begin work at the Newtown Creek Superfund Site. The agreement provides for a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) and certain cost recovery relating to liabilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, (CERCLA, more commonly known as Superfund). https://www.epa.gov/enforcement/case-summary-settlement-reached-newtown-creek-superfund-site 13. Brewster Well Field, Putnam, NY The Brewster Well Field site is located in Brewster, New York. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were found in the village of Brewster’s well field water distribution system in 1978. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Subsequent testing revealed a large plume of groundwater contamination. EPA traced the source of the contamination to a dry cleaner. Operators disposed of dry cleaning wastes in a dry well next to the business until 1983. Between 1978 and 1984, the Village of Brewster used several new well drilling, blending and pumping strategies to keep contaminant levels down. In 1984, the village partnered with EPA to put in a treatment system. The goal was to remove the VOCs and provide safe drinking water to about 2,000 area residents. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202153 14. Brookhaven National Laboratory (USDOE), Suffolk, NY The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) site is a research and development facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It covers 5,265 acres in Upton, New York. The DOE conducts research in physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and energy technologies. The lab is about 8 square miles in size. Much of the environmental contamination at the lab is from accidental spills and historical storage and disposal of chemical and radiological materials. Many cleanup activities have been completed; other cleanup efforts are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202841 15. Byron Barrel & Drum, Genesee, NY The Byron Barrel & Drum site is located in Genesee County, New York. The site is about 2 acres of an 8-acre property off of Transit Road in a rural area. The site was used as a salvage yard for heavy construction equipment; hazardous wastes were also disposed of there. Drums of chemical wastes were abandoned on site without any spill control or containment provisions. Other drums were ripped open or crushed, mixed with soil, and covered over, contaminating soil and groundwater with hazardous substances. Emergency actions to protect human health and the environment have been completed. Long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202257 16. Carroll & Dubies Sewage Disposal, Orange, NY The Caldwell Trucking Co. site is located in Fairfield Township, New Jersey. It consists of properties and groundwater contaminated by the disposal of residential, commercial and industrial septic waste. Immediate actions to protect human health and the environment and soil cleanup have been completed. Long-term groundwater cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201492 17. Cayuga County Ground Water Contamination, Cayuga, NY The Cayuga Groundwater Contamination site includes contaminated groundwater that covers about 4.8 square miles extending from Auburn to Union Springs, New York. It includes the townships of Aurelius, Fleming and Springport. The site contains mostly residential properties mixed with farmland, woodlands and commercial areas. Groundwater at the site is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. The General Electric Company (GE) owned and manufactured semiconductors at a facility on Genesee Street in Auburn. For a time, Powerex, Inc. a joint venture of GE and others, bought the facility and conducted similar operations there. EPA has finalized a plan to address the contaminated groundwater. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204289 18. Circuitron Corp., Suffolk, NY The Circuitron Corporation site was located at 82 Milbar Boulevard, East Farmingdale, New York. Circuitron Corporation manufactured electronic circuit boards on the 1-acre area from 1961 to 1986. The manufacturing process at the facility included drilling, screening, plating and scrubbing processes, all of which generated chemical wastes. Facility operations contaminated groundwater, soils, sediment and a building with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily 1,1,1-trichloroethane and tetrachloroethene. VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air and can migrate from the soils into the groundwater. Short-term cleanups called removal actions have addressed immediate threats to human health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202301 19. Claremont Polychemical Nassau, NY The Claremont Polychemical site is the former location of a manufacturer of pigments for plastics and inks. The facility operated from 1966 to 1980. The 9.5-site is located in an industrial section of Old Bethpage in Nassau County, New York. Facility operations contaminated soil, groundwater and a building with volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. Short-term cleanups called removal actions have addressed immediate threats to human health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201338 ​ 20. Colesville Municipal Landfill, Broome, NY The Colesville Municipal Landfill site is an inactive landfill in Colesville, New York. The Town of Colesville owned and operated the 35-acre landfill from 1965 until 1969, when ownership transferred to Broome County. The landfill accepted about 9,000 tons of municipal waste each year. From 1973 to 1975, industrial wastes such as organic solvents, dyes and metals were placed in the landfill, resulting in groundwater contamination. The landfill closed in 1984. Capping of the 35-acre landfill and treatment of contaminated groundwater has significantly reduced the threat to public health and the environment. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202237 ​ 21. Computer Circuits, Suffolk, NY The Computer Circuits site is located in an industrial park in Hauppauge, New York. From 1969 to 1977, Computer Circuits Corporation operated a circuit board manufacturing facility at the 2-acre property, discharged industrial wastewaters into industrial cesspools on site. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with copper and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. VOC contaminants (in particular, trichloroethylene (TCE)) were also identified at levels of concern in indoor air. Contaminants in groundwater and indoor air posed a risk to human health. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202636 ​ 22. Consolidated Iron and Metal, Orange, NY The Consolidated Iron and Metal site is an inactive car and scrap metal junkyard in Newburgh, New York. From World War I until the early 1940s, the Eureka Shipyard operated at the 7-acre site. Consolidated Iron and Metal Company’s scrap metal processing and storage operations began in the mid-1950s and continued at the site until the facility's closure in 1999. Facility operations led to soil contamination. Contaminants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204175 ​ 23. Cortese Landfill, Sullivan, NY The 5-acre Cortese Landfill site is located in Narrowsburg, New York. From 1970 to 1981, the John Cortese Construction Company operated the landfill. It received primarily municipal wastes. Industrial wastes, including waste solvents, paint thinners, paint sludges and waste oils, were disposed of at the landfill in 1973. Landfill operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Cleanup and long-term operation and maintenance of the remedy are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201867 ​ 24. The 5-acre Cortese Landfill site is located in Narrowsburg, New York. From 1970 to 1981, the John Cortese Construction Company operated the landfill. It received primarily municipal wastes. Industrial wastes, including waste solvents, paint thinners, paint sludges and waste oils, were disposed of at the landfill in 1973. Landfill operations resulted in soil and groundwater contamination with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Cleanup and long-term operation and maintenance of the remedy are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201867 25. Diaz Chemical Corporation, Orleans, NY The Diaz Chemical Corporation (Diaz Chemical) site is located in Holley, New York. The area includes the Diaz Chemical facility and parts of the surrounding residential neighborhood. Following an accidental release of a chemical mixture in 2002, members of the public complained of acute health effects. Residents voluntarily relocated from some of the homes in the neighborhood to area hotels with assistance from Diaz Chemical. In May 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assumed responsibility for the relocation expenses of the residents who remained relocated at that time, secured the site and removed contaminated materials. In June 2003, Diaz Chemical filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the facility, leaving behind large volumes of chemicals in drums and tanks. Immediate cleanup actions at the site have protected immediate threats to human health and the environment. A thermal treatment remedy was selected for the site in 2012. Design and construction efforts related to the site’s long-term cleanup are underway. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203341 ​ 26. Ellenville Scrap Iron and Metal, Ulster, NY The Ellenville Scrap Iron and Metal site is located in Ellenville, New York. It includes a 24-acre former scrap iron and metal reclamation facility and several nearby residential properties. About 10 acres of the site were used for scrap metal operations and battery reclamation from 1950 to 1997. In late 1997, the area was used for landfill purposes and as a tire dump before being abandoned. Following site investigations and short-term cleanups called removal actions, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place to protect human health and the environment. Operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204190 27. Endicott Village Well Field, Broome, NY The Endicott Village Well Field site is located in Endicott, New York. The site includes a Ranney Well and its zone of influence on area groundwater. The boundaries of this zone are the Susquehanna River to the south, West Main Street to the north, Grippen Park to the east and Endicott Landfill to the west. EPA detected vinyl chloride and trace amounts of other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the discharge from the Ranney Well. The landfill is the source of the contamination. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202264 ​ 28. Facet Enterprises, Inc., Chemung, NY The Facet Enterprises, Inc. Superfund site is located in Elmira Heights, Chemung County, New York. The remedy for the site includes: the excavation of contaminated soils and sediments; the construction of a ground water pump and treat system; the construction of an on-site landfill; and the implementation of institutional controls. The trigger for this third five-year review was the previous five-year review signed on September 28, 2007. Based upon reviews of the 1992 Record of Decision (ROD), operation and maintenance reports, a site visit conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) personnel on September 27, 2011, it has been determined that ground water data at the site requires further evaluation to ensure that the site-related contamination is effectively captured and treated by the existing remedy. Evaluation of the vapor intrusion exposure pathway at additional residences needs to be conducted. Therefore, a protectiveness determination for this site cannot be made until the noted additional information is obtained and evaluated. https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/149104.pdf ​ 29. FMC Corp. (Dublin Road Landfill,) Orleans, NY The FMC Corp. (Dublin Road Landfill) site is an inactive waste site in the towns of Ridgeway and Shelby in Orleans County, New York. The 30-acre site includes a 21-acre area that contains two inactive rock quarries and wooded property, and a 9-acre area to the south containing a waste pile, a rectangular pond and a swamp. From 1933 to 1968, about 6 acres of the south parcel were used to dispose of coal ash cinders, laboratory wastes consisting of glass bottles and chemical residues, residues from lime sulfur filtration, building debris and residues from pesticide production areas. The site’s long-term cleanup has been completed, protecting human health and the environment. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201207 ​ 30. Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision, Niagara, NY The Forest Glen Mobile Home Subdivision site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. Prior to 1973, the 39-acre area was used for illegal chemical waste disposal, contaminating soil and groundwater with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Residential development of the site property took place in 1979. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202361 ​ 31. Fulton Avenue, Nassau, NY The Fulton Avenue site is located at 150 Fulton Avenue in Garden City Park in Nassau County, New York. A fabric-cutting mill operated at the 0.8-acre area from 1965 through 1974. The mill’s operations contaminated soil and water with hazardous chemicals. Soil cleanup has been completed. Groundwater cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203853 ​ 32. Fulton Terminals, Oswego, NY The 1.5-acre Fulton Terminals site is located in an urban area adjacent to the Oswego River in Fulton, New York. Millions of gallons of waste, oils, and sludge were stored in tanks at the site and groun water, soil, and sediments were contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Work has been done to clean up visibly-contaminated soil and tar-like wastes, excavate storm drains, remove contaminated soil and treat groundwater. Physical cleanup activites at the site have been completed. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202125 ​ 33. GCL Tie & Treating Inc., Delaware, NY The GCL Tie and Treating (GCL) site is located in Sidney, New York. The 60-acre site includes two major areas – the GCL property and the non-GCL property. The 26-acre GCL property consists of an inactive sawmill and wood treating facility. The non-GCL portion of the site includes two light manufacturing companies located on a parcel of land next to the GCL property. Threats posed by contaminated soil, aboveground tanks and drums containing creosote wastes and sludges have been addressed. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. Area residents receive drinking water from public supply wells, which are routinely tested to ensure compliance with federal and state standards. Fencing restricts access to the site. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203408 ​ 34. GE Moreau, Saratoga, NY The GE Moreau site is located in Moreau, New York. A pit on the site was used by the General Electric Company (GE) for the disposal of industrial waste from 1958 to 1968. Soil, surface water and groundwater are contaminated with hazardous substances. Cleanup actions at the site were completed in 1990, and maintenance and monitoring are ongoing. While groundwater at the site continues to exceed federal cleanup levels for several chemicals of concern, there are currently no exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks to the public. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201858 ​ 35. General Motors (Central Foundry Division,) St. Lawrence, NY The General Motors (Central Foundry Division) site is located in Massena, New York. The cleanup of the GM site is ongoing and is being addressed in stages: immediate actions, which included the installation of a cap on the Industrial Landfill at the site in the late 1980’s to prevent the surface flow of contaminants and reduce potential air exposure from contaminants, and long-term cleanup phases focusing on the cleanup of St. Lawrence and Raquette River system sediments; excavation and removal of contaminated on-site soils; removal of contaminated soil and sediment on St. Regis Mohawk Tribal properties (including Turtle Cove); and treatment of contaminated groundwater. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201644 36. Genzale Plating Co., Nassau, NY The Genzale Plating Company site is located in Franklin Square, New York. It includes a metal-plating facility, an attached two-story office building and an undeveloped backyard area that served as a parking lot and storage area. From 1915 through 2000, the facility electroplated small products such as automobile antennas, parts of ball point pens, and bottle openers. It discharged wastewater containing heavy metals as well as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into four subsurface leaching pits at the rear of the site. Soil cleanup has been completed. Long-term groundwater cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201344 37. Goldisc Recordings, Inc., Suffolk, NY The Goldisc Recordings site is located in Holbrook, New York. The 34-acre area consists of two one-story buildings that occupy 6 acres, 3 acres of pavement surrounding the buildings and 25 acres of undeveloped land. Between 1968 and 1983, Audio Visual, Inc. manufactured audio visual and optical devices, and Goldisc Recordings, Inc. manufactured phonograph records. Wastes generated included large quantities of nickel-plating wastes and hydraulic oil, and lesser quantities of solvents. Plating wastes were stored in aboveground storage tanks. On several occasions, the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS) found chemical wastes in storm drains, holding ponds and dry wells. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Source materials have been cleaned up. Additional groundwater monitoring is expected to continue. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202239 ​ 38. Gowanus Canal, Kings, NY The Gowanus Canal is a 100-foot wide, 1.8-mile long canal in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. The Canal is bounded by several communities, including Park Slope, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens and Red Hook. The Canal empties into New York Harbor. The adjacent waterfront is primarily commercial and industrial, currently consisting of concrete plants, warehouses and parking lots. The Gowanus Canal was built in the mid-1800s and was used as a major industrial transportation route. Manufactured gas plants (MGP), paper mills, tanneries and chemical plants operated along the Canal and discharged wastes into it. In addition, contamination flows into the Canal from overflows from sewer systems that carry sanitary waste from homes and rainwater from storm drains and industrial pollutants. As a result, the Gowanus Canal has become one of the nation's most seriously contaminated water bodies. More than a dozen contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and heavy metals, including mercury, lead and copper, are found at high levels in the sediment in the Canal. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0206222 39. Haviland Complex , Dutchess, NY The Haviland Complex site covers 275 acres in Hyde Park, New York. It includes an apartment complex, a junior high school, an elementary school, a shopping center and several homes. Failure of the septic and sewage systems of a car wash and laundromat contaminated area groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202284 ​ ​ ​ ​ 40. Hertel Landfill, Ulster, NY he Hertel Landfill site is located in Plattekill, New York. The 80-acre area is an inactive waste disposal area. It was established in 1963 as a municipal waste landfill. Until 1977, about 15 acres of the land were used for disposal, contaminating soil, groundwater and surface water with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup activities, long-term groundwater monitoring is ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202267 ​ 41. Hiteman Leather, Herkimer, NY The Hiteman Leather site was the location of a former tannery and leather manufacturing facility located in the Village of West Winfield, New York. Approximately 180,000 gallons of chromium-containing wastewater was discharged from the tannery into three unlined lagoons and nearby wetlands, which drain into the Unadilla River. Settled solids in the lagoons were periodically excavated and deposited as bank material around the lagoons. In 1996, EPA conducted an investigation at the site that found elevated levels of chromium in the soil and surface water. Several other contaminants were detected at low levels in soils, including metals, pesticides, semi-volatiles and volatiles. The investigation also found asbestos-covered pipes throughout the main former tannery building and determined that the wood-framed sections of the building were structurally unsound. Following a comprehensive study to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate cleanup alternatives, EPA selected a cleanup remedy for the site in September 2006. It included excavation of contaminated soil hot spots from the former tannery property; excavation and dredging of contaminated wetland and river sediments next to the former tannery property; solidification (the addition of cement additives to change the physical and chemical characteristics to immobilize contaminants) and consolidation of the excavated/dredged soils and sediments on the former tannery property; placement of a soil cover; and intermittent groundwater extraction and treatment. The cleanup remedy also indicated that the need for remediation of river sediments downstream of the former tannery would be determined based on further testing. During the design of the cleanup remedy, EPA determined that soils did not require solidification prior to disposal, that downstream sediments did not need to be remediated, and that groundwater contamination was not related to disposal activities at the site. EPA updated the site’s cleanup remedy to reflect these findings in 2008. The site cleanup finished in September 2008. After addressing the contaminated soils and sediments, EPA removed the site from the National Priorities List in February 2012. EPA will continue to assess conditions at the site every five years to ensure that the cleanup continues to be protective of human health and the environment. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202360 ​ 42. Hooker (Hyde Park,) Niagara, NY The Hooker (Hyde Park) site is located in Niagara Falls, New York. The 15-acre area was used for the disposal of about 80,000 tons of waste, some of it hazardous material, from 1953 to 1975, resulting in sediment and groundwater contamination with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, the site no longer poses a threat to nearby residents or the environment. Construction of the site’s remedy finished in September 2003. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201306 43. Occidental Petroleum, Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp, Hooker (S Area,) Niagara, NY The Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp./Ruco Polymer Corp. site is located in Hicksville, New York. The 14-acre area is the location of a chemical manufacturing facility that operated from 1945 to 2002. Industrial wastewater discharges, as well as leaks and chemical spills, contaminated site soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, the site no longer poses a threat to human health or the environment. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201477 44. Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corp./Ruco Polymer Corp., Nassau, NY 45. New Cassel/Hicksville Ground Water Contamination, Nassau, NY The New Cassel/Hicksville Ground Water Contamination site (Site) is an area of widespread groundwater contamination in the Towns of North Hempstead, Hempstead and Oyster Bay in Nassau County, New York. Sampling found contaminants in four Town of Hempstead wells, six Hamlet of Hicksville wells and one Village of Westbury well. The primary contaminants observed in groundwater at the Site are tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are contaminants that evaporate easily into the air and dissolve in water. VOCs are often used as ingredients in paints, solvents, aerosol sprays, cleaners, disinfectants, automotive products and dry cleaning fluids. It is believed that past industrial and commercial activities in the area may have contributed to the groundwater contamination at the site. Consistent with the Safe Drinking Water Act that protects public drinking water supplies throughout the nation, the public water suppliers in the area of the Site monitor water quality regularly and have previously installed treatment systems to remove VOCs from groundwater. From 1988 to 2010, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) identified a number of sources of the contamination and further investigated the contaminated groundwater pursuant to New York State authorities. In 2010, NYSDEC requested that EPA list the Site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). The Site was listed on the NPL in September 2011. EPA is addressing the Site in discrete phases or components known as operable units or OUs. After the Site’s NPL listing, site investigations to determine the nature and extent of contamination and to identify and evaluate remedial alternatives began https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203974 46. Hopewell Precision Area Contamination, Dutchess, NY The Hopewell Precision site is located in Hopewell Junction, New York. The 5.7-acre area was the location of a manufacturing facility that produced sheet metal parts and assemblies. Operations on site contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA is working to identify the potential for exposure to contaminants at the site and developing the site’s long-term remedy. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201588 ​ 47. Islip Municipal Sanitary Landfill, Suffolk, NY The Islip Municipal Sanitary Landfill site is located in Islip, New York. The 55-acre landfill is part of a 109-acre complex operated by the Islip Resource Recovery Agency. The Town of Islip operated the landfill from 1963 to 1990. Wastes disposed of at the landfill contaminated groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup efforts to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is in place. Operation and maintenance activities are ongoing, including the operation of a groundwater treatment system. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201714 48. Jackson Steel, Nassau, NY The Jackson Steel site is an inactive "roll form metal shapes" manufacturing facility in Mineola and North Hempstead, New York. Jackson Steel operated at the site from 1970 to 1991. The site is bordered to the north by commercial and single-family dwellings, to the east by a two-story apartment complex, to the south by a daycare center, and to the west by an office building and restaurant. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Following cleanup efforts to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is in place. Currently, there are no exposure pathways that could result in unacceptable risks. None is expected as long as the site use does not change and vapor mitigation systems continue to be properly operated, monitored and maintained. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204218 49. Johnstown City Landfill, Fulton, NY The Johnstown City Landfill was a municipally operated, unlined landfill which accepted sanitary, industrial and municipal wastes between 1947 and 1989. The Johnstown City Landfill is northwest of the City of Johnstown in Fulton County, New York. Between 1947 and 1960, 34 acres of the 68-acre site were used as an open refuse disposal facility, before being converted to a sanitary landfill. The industrial wastes generated by local tanneries and textile plants and were accepted at the landfill until mid-1977. SludgeExternal Web Site Icon from the Gloversville-Johnstown Joint Sewage Treatment Plant was accepted at the landfill from 1973 to April 1979. There are no records indicating the amount of industrial wastes which were disposed at the landfill. On June 10, 1986, the Johnstown City Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the United States Environmental Protection AgencyExternal Web Site Icon (US EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC). In June 1989, the NYS DOH completed a preliminary health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). A conclusion in the preliminary health assessment was that the Johnstown City Landfill is a potential human health hazard and that the most significant public health concern was the potential for site contaminants in groundwater to migrate to downgradient residential wells. Recommendations of the preliminary health assessment included the need to further characterize the degree and extent of contamination in groundwater and at the site. A remedial investigation (RI) was conducted at the site between June 1989 and March 1992. The RI included sampling of residential water supplies, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, leachate seeps, sediments, air, and studies of the hydrogeologic conditions at and near the landfill. The preferred remedy for the site was finalized in a March 1993 record of decision (ROD) and includes: Excavation of sediments in the LaGrange Gravel Pit; Construction of a multi-layer cap over the landfill mound; Extension of the public water supply for the City of Johnstown to private homes; Erection of a security fence around the landfill mound; Institution of land-use restrictions; and Environmental monitoring which will include long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and sediments. Past public health concerns included the potential for contaminants to migrate to the City of Johnstown public water supply Wells 1 and 2 on Maple Avenue southeast of the site as well as the possibility of contamination of private drinking water supplies downgradient of the landfill. The primary concerns of residents living near the site relate to the potential for landfill contaminants to affect their drinking water supplies (private wells). During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, US EPA and NYS DEC have sampled residential wells near the site and participated in numerous public meetings to present findings of landfill investigations and groundwater sampling activities, address public and community health concerns as well as present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. Exposure to organic contaminants in private water supplies occurred in the past. One residential water supply had contaminants above NYS DOH drinking water standards. This property was purchased by the City of Johnstown in 1980; the well was properly abandoned and the property remains vacant. Prior to 1980, when contamination was first detected, it is not known how long or if users of this water supply were exposed to organic contaminants. Past completed exposure pathways to site contaminants include exposure to on-site wastes and leachate. However, there are no contaminant data to evaluate the public health significance of these past exposures. Potential human exposure pathways to contaminants originating at the landfill include ingestion of fish; inhalation of VOCs and particulate chromium in ambient air, direct contact, ingestion and inhalation of VOCs in surface water sediment, leachate, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to contaminants in surface water, groundwater, leachate, on-site waste, sediment in LaGrange Gravel Pit and drinking water will be eliminated once the selected remedy for clean-up of the site is in place. Because of past, present and possible future human exposures to contaminants in drinking water and potential (past and present) exposures to contaminants in fish and surface water, the Johnstown City Landfill poses a public health hazard. ATSDR's Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) has evaluated this Public Health Assessment to determine appropriate follow-up health activities. The HARP determined that those persons exposed in the past should be considered for inclusion in the NYS DOH's registry being developed for VOC exposures from drinking contaminated water. The proposed measures for remediation of the Johnstown City Landfill as described in the ROD should be carried out to eliminate the potential for human exposure to contaminants at and near the landfill. Specifically, public water should be extended to the affected and potentially affected residences with private water supplies, since initial groundwater remediation does not include pumping and treating of the groundwater contaminant plume. BACKGROUND A. Site Description and History The Johnstown City Landfill was a municipally operated, unlined landfill which accepted sanitary, industrial and municipal wastes between 1947 and 1989. The Johnstown City Landfill is 1.5 miles northwest of the City of Johnstown and 1.75 miles west of the City of Gloversville on West Fulton Street Extension in Fulton County, New York (refer to Figures 1 and 2, Appendix A). Prior to landfill operations, the site was used extensively for excavation of sand and gravel. Between 1947 and 1960, 34 acres of the 68-acre site were used as an open refuse disposal facility, before being converted to a sanitary landfill. The landfill had been used for the disposal of wastes for 12 years by three septic tank and industrial waste haulers. The industrial wastes were generated primarily by local tanneries and textile plants and were accepted at the landfill until mid-1977. Sludge from the Gloversville-Johnstown Joint Sewage Treatment Plant was accepted at the landfill from 1973 to April 1979. There are no records available which indicate the amount of industrial wastes which were disposed at the landfill. Most of the tannery wastes were disposed as chromium-treated hide trimmings and other materials. Sewage sludge was disposed in open piles on-site for six years between 1973 and 1979 and reportedly contained chromium, iron and lead. Sewage sludge was disposed at a rate of about 20,000 cubic yards per year (yds3/yr). A former disposal pit on the westward side of the landfill was used for demolition debris and metals wastes. Reportedly, an unknown number of drums containing chemicals were also disposed at the site. The landfill consists of two flat terraces and a former disposal pit at the base of a steep ridge on the westward side of the landfill. Currently, the landfill has an interim (native soil) cover and there are several leachate outbreaks at the foot of the landfill on-site and at an off-site downgradient spring (LaGrange Spring). The site has two fences with locked gates at the main site entrance, which prevent vehicular access. These fences were installed before the landfill was closed in 1989, to prevent unauthorized dumping. The rest of the site perimeter is heavily wooded or borders active farmlands. Past investigations completed at and near the Johnstown City Landfill include: A sanitary landfill study of the City of Johnstown Landfill which was completed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) in April 1978; A study of aquatic life in Mathew Creek, which was conducted by the NYS DEC in November 1978; A methane gas migration study completed by the NYS DEC in September 1981; A preliminary investigation of the Johnstown City Landfill which was completed by Ecological Analysts, Inc., in November 1983; An evaluation of the status of groundwater contamination near the Johnstown City Landfill which was completed by Paul A. Rubin in September 1984; and A study of ammonia toxicity and chemical analysis in relation to Mathew Creek which was completed by the NYS DEC in July 1987. The sanitary landfill study evaluated if past disposal activities at the landfill had resulted in groundwater contamination in the area and if this contamination was affecting water quality in the City of Johnstown's public water supply wells, southeast of the site. The study of aquatic life in Mathew Creek investigated the effects of leachate discharge from the landfill on fish and other organisms; findings of this study indicated that water quality in the upper reaches of the creek were toxic to fish, however, it was not concluded if fish mortality was due to naturally occurring poor water quality conditions or site contaminants. The methane migration study evaluated the potential for explosive levels of methane to migrate off-site; findings of this study indicated that elevated levels of methane were detected on private property northeast of the landfill. The preliminary investigation and study of groundwater contamination included installation and sampling of groundwater monitoring wells at the landfill; additionally, surface water sampling was conducted at selected locations along Mathew Creek. The investigation of ammonia toxicity and chemical analysis evaluated water quality in Mathew Creek. On May 5, 1983, representatives of Ecological Analysts, Inc., a consultant for the NYS DEC, conducted a site inspection of the Johnstown City Landfill. During this site inspection, the location and condition of existing on-site monitoring wells was noted. An extensive sand and gravel mining operation was observed northwest of the active portion of the landfill and groundwater seeps were observed along the southwest face of the excavation. Several empty 55-gallon drums and 10,000 gallon tanks were observed near the base of the south landfill slope; in addition, a leachate seep was also observed in this area. In the sand and gravel pit on the south side of the landfill, open water had collected and a large quantity of sludge-like material was floating on the surface of this standing water. Household wastes were scattered along the eastern side of the landfill face. On June 10, 1986, the Johnstown City Landfill was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), also known as Superfund, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the NYS DEC. In 1988, the City of Johnstown, entered into a Consent Order with the NYS DEC to conduct a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) at the site. Landfill operations ceased in June 1989. In June 1989, the New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) completed a preliminary health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill under a cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In the preliminary health assessment, inhalation of contaminated dust and particulates as well as dermal contact with contaminated surface water, groundwater and soils were identified as the potential human exposure routes of concern for on-site workers. Potential human exposure routes of concern identified for off-site receptors included ingestion of contaminated groundwater and dermal contact with contaminated surface water and soils. In the preliminary health assessment, it was concluded that the Johnstown City Landfill is a potential human health hazard and determined that the potential for site contaminants in groundwater to migrate to downgradient residential wells was the most significant public health concern. Further characterization of the degree and extent of contamination in groundwater at the site was recommended. The RI was conducted in multiple phases between June 1989 and March 1992. The first phase of the RI was conducted between June 1989 and June 1990; the second phase of the RI was completed between July 1990 and March 1992. The RI included sampling of residential water supplies, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, leachate seeps, sediments and air as well as studies of the hydrogeologic conditions at and near the landfill. Ecological studies in Halls Brook and Mathew Creek were also conducted as part of the RI, as well as delineation of wetlands near Mathew Creek. Findings of the RI indicated that 34 acres of the 68-acre site consist of mixed municipal wastes buried at depths ranging from 29.5 feet to 32 feet below surface. Scrap animal hides were found in several of the test pits confirming past disposal of tannery wastes at the landfill. As part of the FS for the site, several clean-up alternatives were evaluated. The preferred remedy for the site includes: Excavation of sediments in the LaGrange Gravel Pit and placing excavated materials on the existing landfill (the gravel pit will be backfilled with clean fill); Construction of a multi-layer cap over the landfill mound to isolate wastes from rainfall and human contact; Extension of the public water supply for the City of Johnstown to homes near the landfill to replace existing water supplies which may be affected by landfill contaminants migrating off-site in groundwater; Installation of a security fence around the landfill mound; Institution of land-use restrictions; and Environmental monitoring to determine the effectiveness of the remedial measures, including long-term monitoring of groundwater, surface water and sediments. The provisions for capping include measures to control and monitor methane migration. The preferred remedy also includes provisions to reevaluate groundwater remediation in the event that monitoring results indicate that groundwater and surface water quality are not being restored to acceptable levels through natural attenuation as a result of reduced leachate generation. If groundwater remediation does occur in the future, it would include the extraction of groundwater using wells and submersible pumps with on-site treatment to remove metals and volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), with discharge of the treated water to the aquifer or to a stream. A record of decision (ROD) supporting implementation of this preferred remedy was finalized by US EPA in March 1993. Currently, design of the selected remedy is underway. B. Actions Completed During the Public Health Assessment Process In May of 1977, the NYS DOH expressed concern about landfilling practices at the Johnstown City Landfill and the possible effects of groundwater contamination associated with continued use of the Maple Avenue water supply wells, southeast of the site. NYS DOH recommended to the Johnstown City Council that water samples from the City water supply wells on Maple Avenue be collected every six months and analyzed for chromium to ensure that users of the water supply were not exposed to unacceptable levels. In 1977, the NYS DOH also recommended to the City Council that consumers who received drinking water from the Maple Avenue wells for prolonged periods of time be advised of the high sodium content. Because of concerns with continued degradation of the water quality in two City water supply wells on Maple Avenue, the NYS DOH recommended to the Johnstown City Council that the City's long range water supply planning should consider alternate water sources. The City of Johnstown was advised to limit use of the Maple Avenue wells, except during emergencies. The City was also advised to continue to purchase water from the City of Gloversville to supplement their water supply and to initiate development of a new water source. The City of Johnstown public water supply wells on Maple Avenue (wells 1 and 2), south of the landfill, were not used after October 1980 and the wells were permanently taken out of service (i.e., the pumps were removed) in the mid-1980's. Representatives of NYS DOH as well as consultants working for the potentially responsible parties (PRP's) have conducted sampling of residential and other private water supplies near the Johnstown City Landfill as part of past investigatory activities at the site. NYS DOH has provided property owners and residents with copies of the analytical results as well as an explanation of the findings of their water sample results. During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, US EPA and NYS DEC have participated in numerous public meetings to present findings of landfill investigations and groundwater sampling activities, address public and community health concerns as well as present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. On May 17, 1989, a public meeting was held to present the draft workplan for investigation of the landfill and proposed sampling of 18 residential wells near the site. In June 1990, a public meeting was held to present findings of the first phase of the RI and present plans for the second phase of the RI. The most recent public meeting was held on February 10, 1993, to present the proposed measures for remediation of the landfill. The landfill was closed in June 1989 and vehicular access to the site has been restricted by a locked gate across the access road at the main entrance. Community outreach and community education has been conducted in the past by NYS DEC, NYS DOH and US EPA. Informational materials have been provided to the public about ongoing and proposed activities at the site throughout the RI/FS process. Information repositories have been established at numerous locations including the NYS DEC and US EPA regional offices, the Johnstown Public Library and the Johnstown City Attorney's office. These repositories contain technical, factual and other information related to the site and are available for public reference. The only residential well which showed contamination above NYS DOH drinking water standards was purchased by the City of Johnstown in 1980. The water supply well at this property was properly abandoned and the house remains vacant. C. Site Visit On October 22, 1986, Mr. Gary Litwin of the NYS DOH met with representatives of the City of Johnstown, NYS DEC and a citizens action group known as Rainbow Alliance for a Cleaner Environment (RACE). The purpose of the site visit was to observe and evaluate the effect of chromium sludge deposits which had eroded from the landfill on to an adjacent residential property. Following this site visit, NYS DEC expressed concern about the quality of water that had ponded in the gravel pit; Mr. Litwin of the NYS DOH, expressed concern that leachate seeps from the landfill had eroded a gully, exposing municipal refuse and sludge. Furthermore, the leachate seeps were flowing off-site to a small pond through an area which, at the time, was frequently used by off-road vehicles. Mr. Litwin also reported that direct contact with this leachate was occurring and that past sampling of the leachate by NYS DEC showed high levels of chromium, lead and cadmium. Based on the findings of this site investigation, NYS DOH recommended to the NYS DEC that measures be taken to prevent further off-site migration of leachate and prevent direct contact with exposed wastes and contaminated soil. Additionally, NYS DOH recommended that sampling of surface water and sediment be conducted in the pond. Over the past several years, numerous site visits to the Johnstown City Landfill have been conducted by NYS DOH staff, including Richard Fedigan, Gary Litwin and Claudine Jones Rafferty. Representatives of various other agencies, including US EPA, NYS DEC and the NYS DOH Amsterdam District Office were also present during many of these site visits. The purpose of these visits included sampling of groundwater and investigating site conditions. Past site visits have shown little evidence of trespassers. The most recent site visit was conducted by Claudine Jones Rafferty of the NYS DOH on February 10, 1993. The purpose of this site visit was to evaluate current demographics and the environmental setting surrounding the site. Access onto the landfill proper was not made during this site visit, due to adverse weather conditions and deep snow. Site conditions are not known to have changed since this site visit was conducted. D. Demographics, Land Use, and Natural Resource Use Demographics The Johnstown City Landfill is about two miles northwest of the City of Johnstown in Fulton County, New York. In general, the area surrounding the landfill is sparsely populated. However, there are about 80 private residences along West Fulton Street Extension, Maple Avenue Extension, Johnstown Avenue Extension and O'Neil Avenue Extension. NYS DOH estimated, from the 1990 Census, that 525 people live within 1 mile of the Johnstown City Landfill. The ethnic distribution of the population within 1 mile of the site is 100 percent white. The site is within census tract 9906.00; in this census tract, 5.3 percent of the population is under 5 years of age, 22.6 percent is 5-19 years of age, 56.5 percent is 20-64 years of age and 15.6 percent is 65 years or older. The median household income in 1989 for this census tract was $27,189, with 5 percent of the families with income below the poverty level. Land Use Land use in the area surrounding the landfill is mixed and includes residential, agricultural and recreational development. The area immediately north of the site is part of a State reforestation area and residential density in this area is low. Open fields exist to the south and west and mixed woodlands exist between the landfill and the agricultural areas to the south and also along the eastern site boundary. The two nearest residential properties border the northern site boundary. There are several sand and gravel operations in the Johnstown area including the LaGrange Gravel Pit, just east of the site, and the former sand and gravel operation on-site. Natural Resource Use Surface Water The Johnstown City Landfill is situated south of a major drainage divide that bisects Fulton County. In general, surface water drainage is to the southeast near the site. Mathew Creek is the primary surface water feature near the site (refer to Figure 2, Appendix A) and is classified by the NYS DEC as a "Class A" surface water body, which is designated as a source of water supply for drinking, cooking, recreation and fishing. The headwaters of Mathew Creek, known as LaGrange Springs, are about 1,100 feet southeast of the site. The presence of LaGrange Springs and Mathew Creek is attributed to the intersection of the groundwater table with the ground surface (TWM Northeast, 1992). Mathew Creek flows through Hulbert's Pond and converges with Halls Brook to the southeast before discharging to Cayadutta Creek, which ultimately drains to the Mohawk River. A privately owned, manmade pond, known as Hulberts Pond, has been developed along Mathew Creek, just east of the intersection of Hulbert Road and O'Neil Avenue Extension. Hulberts Pond was stocked with fish in the past, however, a fishkill in this pond was reported in June 1984 and it is not known if Hulberts Pond is currently used for fishing or other recreational activities. LaGrange Gravel Pit, which issituated east of the landfill boundary, is not classified by the NYS DEC as a surface water body. Groundwater Local groundwater near the site occurs as a result of precipitation that percolates through surficial soils and unconsolidated deposits to the underlying bedrock (TWM Northeast, 1992). In general, groundwater in the overburden deposits flows from areas north and northwest of the landfill towards LaGrange Springs and Matthew Creek, south of the site. Groundwater flow in the bedrock aquifer is from west to east near the site. Groundwater flow directions do not appear to be affected by seasonal fluctuations in groundwater levels. Groundwater near the site is used as a drinking water supply at private residences as well as for agricultural purposes at nearby farms, including a dairy farm operation. There are about 80 residences along West Fulton Street Extension, Maple Avenue Extension and O'Neil Avenue Extension; the nearest homes border the site perimeter to the north, along West Fulton Street Extension. The homes along O'Neil Avenue Extension are about one mile south of the site and the homes along Johnstown Avenue Extension are about one half mile to one mile east and southeast of the site. Most of these homes rely on groundwater for drinking and other household uses. Prior to 1980, the City of Johnstown also used groundwater in the area near the landfill as a source for the public water supply. Two former City water supply wells (wells 1 and 2, also known as the Maple Avenue wells) are about 5,000 feet southeast of the landfill (refer to Figures 5 and 11, Appendix A). These wells were installed in 1965 to supplement the existing main source of water (Cork Center Reservoir) for the City's public water supply. Groundwater from the Maple Avenue Wells was pumped to the Maylender Reservoir for storage prior to distribution. The only treatment that this water received was disinfection (i.e., chlorination). These two wells were intended to provide about 1 million gallons per day (mgd) of water and served about 10,000 people. However, due to natural water quality degradation in the Maple Avenue Wellfield between 1965 and 1977, use of these wells gradually declined during the mid to late 1970's. Average water use of the City water supply was about 2.85 mgd. These wells have not been used since 1980 and were permanently taken out of service in the mid-1980's. E. Health Outcome Data The NYS DOH maintains several health outcome data bases which could be used to generate site-specific data, if warranted. These data bases include the cancer registry, the congenital malformations registry, the heavy metals registry, the occupational lung disease registry, vital records (birth and death certificates) and hospital discharge information. COMMUNITY HEALTH CONCERNS In August and September of 1977, the NYS DOH received numerous complaints about the taste and odor of drinking water as well as possible illness by users of the public water supply served by the Maple Avenue wells. In November 1977, a private well serving a residence about 1 mile southeast of the Johnstown City Landfill was sampled by the NYS DOH. With the exception of lead, which was reported at 0.1 milligrams per liter (mg/L), all parameters were within normal ranges. The reported lead concentration exceeded the existing NYS DOH maximum contaminant level (MCL) in effect at that time (0.05 mg/L) for public water supplies. The residents using this water supply as well as members of the community expressed concern about the possible health effects from exposure to elevated lead in drinking water. In 1978, a nearby resident reported to the NYS DEC that fish were not surviving in Hulbert's Pond. This resident attributed the poor fish survival to landfill leachate discharging into surface waters upstream of Hulbert's Pond. In March 1979, a resident living north of the Johnstown City Landfill reported to the NYS DOH that a significant change in his drinking water supply had occurred and expressed concern about the proximity of the landfill to affect his water supply. In June 1990, the NYS DEC held a public meeting to present findings of the interim RI/FS report. Following this meeting, one of the citizens provided written comments to the NYS DEC expressing concern about a number of issues related to the potential for chemicals to migrate from the Johnstown City Landfill and contamination of their drinking water. In the fall of 1991, a representative of the Rainbow Alliance for Clean Environment (RACE), expressed concern about the analytical results of a water sample that was collected from a private residence near the Johnstown City Landfill. Specifically, these concerns pertained to ammonia, a compound that was detected in the residents water sample, and the possible health effects from exposure to ammonia in drinking water. During the past eight years, representatives of the NYS DOH, NYS DEC and US EPA have participated in numerous public meetings regarding investigation and sampling activities, community and public health concerns and remediation activities at the Johnstown City Landfill. The primary concerns of residents living near the site relate to the potential for landfill contaminants to affect their drinking water supplies (private wells). Additionally, the community has expressed concern about contamination of surficial waters downgradient of the landfill. On February 10, 1993, US EPA representatives held a public meeting at the Johnstown High School to present the findings of the RI/FS and discuss the proposed measures to remediate the Johnstown City Landfill. Claudine Jones Rafferty and Richard Fedigan of the NYS DOH and representatives of the NYS DEC also attended the meeting. About 50 citizens attended this meeting. The primary community concerns presented at this meeting were associated with initial and long-term costs associated with construction, maintenance and use of the proposed public water distribution system to residents living near the landfill. Concerns about the extent contaminant migration from the landfill and the need for preventative measures to control future contaminant migration were also expressed. No specific health concerns were identified. During public review of the draft public health assessment for the Johnstown City Landfill, one citizen expressed concern that the incidence of cancer in the area was high, given the relatively small population. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/HAC/pha/pha.asp?docid=221&pg=1 50. Jones Chemicals, Inc., Livingston, NY The Jones Chemicals, Inc. site is located in Caledonia, New York. A chemical manufacturing plant at the 4210-acre area repackaged chlorine from bulk containers into smaller containers for resale from 1942 to 1960. From 1960 to 1977, Jones Chemicals repackaged chlorinated solvents and petroleum products, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The company stopped repackaging solvents in 1985. The plant now produces sodium hypochlorite (bleach) solutions and sodium bisulfite. It also repackages chlorine, sulfur dioxide, inorganic mineral acids, sodium hypochlorite, ammonium hydroxide, caustic soda and various inorganic water-treatment chemicals. Spills occurred during the transfer and repackaging of many of these chemicals, contaminating soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term soil and groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201302 51. Kentucky Avenue Well Field, Chemung, NY The Kentucky Avenue Wellfield (KAW) is part of the EWB public-water supply system. It was constructed in 1962 and provided approximately 10 percent of the potable water produced by the Elmira water Board (EWB) until its closure in 1980 following the discovery of elevated levels of trichloroethylene (TCE). TCE contamination was first detected in the KAW in May 1980 during an inventory of local wells initiated by the New York Department of Health (NYSDOH). In July 1980, the Chemung County Health Department conducted further groundwater sampling in the area and similarly found elevated levels of TCE in the KAW and several private residences and commercial facilities. As a result of these findings, the EWB closed the KAW in September 1980 and removed it from its other sources of potable water for its users. In 1983, the Site was placed on the federal National Priorities List of hazardous waste sites. Additional sampling conducted by local, state, and federal agencies through 1985 identified TCE contamination throughout the Newtown Creek Aquifer. In March 1985, EPA initiated a removal action for the purpose of providing alternate water supplies to impacted residences not connected to the public water distribution system. Residences whose private wells were found to be contaminated with TCE in excess of the NYSDOH drinking water standards for public water supplies were supplied with bottled water and ultimately connected to the public water supply. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202142 ​ 52. Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc., Suffolk, NY The Lawrence Aviation Industries, Inc. (LAI) site is located in Port Jefferson Station, New York. The 126-acre area includes LAI's manufacturing plant, which historically produced titanium sheeting for the aeronautics industry. The LAI facility consists of 10 buildings in the southwestern portion of the property. An abandoned, unlined earthen lagoon that formerly received liquid wastes is west of the buildings. A former drum crushing area is south of the buildings. About 80 acres northeast and east of the LAI facility are referred to as the "Outlying Parcels." They are vacant, wooded areas. Finally, the site also includes a downgradient contaminated groundwater plume. Currently, the LAI facility is not operating, many buildings are vacant, and unused. Past disposal practices resulted in a variety of contaminant releases, including trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), acid wastes, oils, sludge, metals and other plant wastes. Following short-term cleanups to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy is now in place. Groundwater treatment is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201335 ​ 53. Lehigh Valley Railroad, Genesee, NY The Lehigh Valley Railroad site is located in LeRoy, New York. The area is the location of a chemical spill that resulted from a train derailment in 1970. About 1 ton of cyanide crystals and around 30,000 to 35,000 gallons of trichloroethene (TCE) spilled onto the ground, contaminating soil and groundwater. The site includes portions of Gulf Road, the former railroad bed and the properties next to the railroad crossing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203481 54. Li Tungsten Corp., Nassau, NY The LI Tungsten Superfund Site is located in the City of Glen Cove, Nassau County, New York. The Site consists of the former Li Tungsten facility property located at 63 Herbhill Road, certain portions of the nearby Captain’s Cove property that were contaminated with radioactive material, and other areas where radiologically contaminated materials associated with the former Li Tungsten facility came to be located, including portions of Glen Cove Creek. The former Li Tungsten facility is 26 acres and consists of three separate parcels. The 23-acre Captain’s Cove property is bounded by Hempstead Harbor to the west, Garvies Point Preserve to the north, the Glen Cove Anglers’ Club to the east, and Glen Cove Creek to the south. A four-acre wetland makes up a portion of the Captain’s Cove property’s southern boundary with the Creek. The Wah Chang Smelting and Refining Company owned the former Li Tungsten facility from the 1940s to about 1984 and, during that period, a succession of entities, including Teledyne Inc. and the Li Tungsten Corp., operated the facility. Operations generally involved the processing of ore and scrap tungsten concentrates to metal tungsten powder and tungsten carbide powder, although other specialty metal products were also produced. Portions of the Captain’s Cove property were used as a dumpsite for a variety of wastes, including the disposal of spent ore residuals by the operators of the former Li Tungsten facility. The Glen Cove Development Corporation (GCDC) acquired the Li Tungsten facility property in 1984 and leased it to the Li Tungsten Corporation, which declared bankruptcy in 1985 and ceased operations. Glen Cove Creek is a 1.0 mile federal navigation channel that is maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers. It extends from Hempstead Harbor easterly to the head of navigation at Charles Street near the municipal center of Glen Cove. During routine maintenance dredging in 2001, the Corps discovered the presence of radioactive materials in Glen Cove Creek, which led to the indefinite suspension of the dredging program and the inclusion of the creek as part of the Li Tungsten Superfund Site. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202972 ​ 55. Liberty Industrial Finishing, Nassau, NY he Liberty Industrial Finishing site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. During World War II and the Korean War, industrial operations at the 30-acre site included aircraft parts manufacturing and associated metal finishing processes largely in support of military efforts. After the wars, the site was used for other industrial and warehousing operations. During these operations, wastes were discharged into below-grade sumps, underground leaching chambers and unlined groundwater recharge basins or lagoons. These operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment and vapor monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201184 ​ 56. Little Valley, Cattaraugus, NY The Little Valley Superfund site is comprised of a plume of trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater that extends approximately eight miles southeastward from the Village of Little Valley to the northern edge of the City of Salamanca, which is part of the Allegheny Indian Reservation, in Cattauragus County, New York. The site is located in a rural, agricultural area with a number of small, active and inactive industries and more than 200 residential properties situated along Route 353, the main transportation route between Little Valley and the City of the Salamanca. In 1982, the Cattaraugus County Health Department (CCHD) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), while investigating TCE contamination in the vicinity of a small manufacturing facility on Route 353, detected TCE in nearby private wells. NYSDEC installed a number of monitoring wells in the area to investigate possible sources of the contamination, including a former drum storage area, a private disposal site next to the former drum storage area, an inactive municipal landfill which accepted industrial wastes, and industrial facilities. Following the installation of treatment systems on private wells, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place, which consisted of a soil remediation, a long-term groundwater monitoring program, and an evaluation of the potential for soil vapor intrusion into structures within the study area and mitigation, if necessary. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204016 ​ 57. Ludlow Sand & Gravel, Oneida, NY (REMOVED) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting its fourth five-year review of the Ludlow Sand and Gravel Superfund Site, located in the town of Paris, Oneida County, New York. This review seeks to confirm that the cleanup conducted at the site, which included removal of contaminated soil and sediments, placement of a cap over the landfill at the site, solidification of deeper contaminated soil and ground water monitoring, continues to protect human health and the environment. Although the Ludlow Sand and Gravel site was deleted from the National Priorities List in December 2013, five-year reviews will continue as needed. A summary of cleanup activities and an evaluation of the protectiveness of the implemented remedy will be included in the five-year review report. http://town.paris.ny.us/content/News/View/31:field=documents;/content/Documents/File/72.pdf 58. MacKenzie Chemical Works, Inc. Suffolk, NY The MacKenzie Chemical Works site is located in Central Islip, New York. The site property was used from 1948 to 1987 for the manufacture of various chemical products, including fuel additives and metal acetylacetonates. According to the Suffolk County Department of Health Services, MacKenzie stored 1, 2, 3-trichloropropane in three 10,000-gallon tanks on site. Other historical waste sources include other storage tanks, leaking drums, waste lagoons, cesspools and stormwater drywells. Spills, explosions and fires have occurred at the facility, including a methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) spill in 1977, a nitrous oxide release in 1978 and an MEK spill/fire in 1979. The site’s long-term remedy is in place. Soil and groundwater treatment are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202187 59. Malta Rocket Fuel Area, Saratoga, NY The Malta Rocket Fuel Area site is located in the towns of Malta and Stillwater, in Saratoga County, New York. The site consists of the 165-acre former Malta Test Station and undeveloped forest that forms part of the safety easement for the Test Station. The U.S. government established the Test Station in 1945 for rocket engine and fuel testing. Research and development activities at the Test Station continued until 1984. Operations at the site involved the use of hazardous substances, which resulted in surface water and groundwater becoming contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride (carbon tet), and contaminating the site soil with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The cleanup at the site has been completed and included excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil and debris and treatment of the water supply. The long-term cleanup remedy also includes ongoing surface water monitoring and periodic monitoring of groundwater. Active redevelopment of the site is underway. In 2009, the Saratoga Economic Development Corporation began the first phase of the construction of the Luther Forest Technology Campus. GLOBALFOUNDRIES U.S., Inc., the first tenant at the Luther Forest Technology Campus, has already redeveloped a portion of the site. Eventually, the entire Malta Rocket Fuel Area site is expected to be encompassed by the technology campus. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=020208 ​ 60. Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc., Nassau, NY The Mattiace Petrochemical Co., Inc. site is located in Glen Cove, New York. The 2.5-acre area is an inactive chemical distribution facility. From the mid-1960s until 1987, Mattiace received chemicals by tank truck and redistributed them to its customers. The company also operated the M&M Drum Cleaning Company on site until 1982. During this time, a Quonset hut, shed, concrete loading dock and about 56 storage tanks were located on site. In 1988, EPA undertook an emergency action to secure the site and remove more than 100,000 gallons of hazardous liquids. Construction of the site’s long-term soil and groundwater remedy as described in the 1991 Record of Decision (ROD) finished in 1998. The treatment system operated for approximately 16 years before a ROD Amendment was signed in September 2014 changing the remedy. The amended remedy is currently in the design phase with remedial action implementation anticipated to begin in summer 2016. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201219 61. Mercury Refining, Inc., Albany, NY The Mercury Refining, Inc. site is located on the border of the towns of Guilderland and Colonie, New York. From 1955 to 1998, Mercury Refining Company, Inc. (MERECO) used the half-acre area for reclaiming mercury from batteries and other mercury-bearing materials. Facility operations contaminated soils, groundwater and sediments in a tributary of Patroon Creek with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury. Cleanup at the site was completed in 2014. Long-term groundwater and ecological monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201552 ​ 62. Mohonk Road Industrial Plant, Ulster, NY The Mohonk Road Industrial Plant site is located in High Falls, New York. From the early 1960s through the 1970s, industrial operations at the 14.5-acre area included metal finishing, wet spray painting and fixture manufacturing. All of these operations required the use of solvents. Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are contaminants that evaporate easily in the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA developed the site’s long-term remedy. Long-term groundwater treatment is ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0203945 63. Nepera Chemical Co., Inc., Orange, NY The Nepera Chemical Company site is located in Hamptonburgh, New York. The site is a 29-acre former industrial waste disposal facility. Between 1953 and 1967, lagoons at the site received about 50,000 gallons of wastewater per day from the Nepera chemical plant in Harriman, New York. Nepera made a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial chemicals. State inspectors detected leaks from the lagoons in 1958 and 1960, and operations ended in December 1967. The company’s operations contaminated soils and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. 29https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201188 ​ 64. Niagara Mohawk Power Co. (Saratoga Springs,) Saratoga, NY The Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. (NMPC) (Saratoga Springs Plant) site is located in Saratoga Springs, New York. The site includes a 7-acre parcel (the NMPC Property), the former skating rink property (a 2.3-acre property formerly owned by the City of Saratoga Springs), and portions of Spring Run Creek. The Saratoga Gas Light Company, a predecessor company of Niagara Mohawk, used the NMPC property for coal gas manufacturing. Various other companies then used the property from 1853 until the late 1940s. Byproduct materials containing hazardous substances were disposed of at various locations at the NMPC property. The property's subsurface contains coal tar waste deposits from these operations. Niagara Mohawk operated the site from 1950 to 1999 as a district service center and headquarters for its electric line, natural gas, vehicle and equipment repair, maintenance, storage facilities, and tree trimming crews servicing the Saratoga District. The site’s long-term cleanup and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202182 65. Old Bethpage Landfill, Nassau, NY he Old Bethpage Landfill site is located in Old Bethpage, New York. The Town of Oyster Bay operated the 65-acre landfill from 1957 to 1986. In addition to municipal wastes and garbage, industrial wastes from local industries were also disposed in the landfill in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Landfill operations contaminated groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring at the site are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201951 66. Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area Nassau, NY The Old Roosevelt Field Contaminated Groundwater Area site is located in Garden City, New York. Two Garden City public drinking water supply wells at the site have been found to be contaminated with the chlorinated solvents tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). The site includes the former Roosevelt Field airfield. Chlorinated solvents such as TCE and PCE have been widely used for aircraft manufacturing, maintenance and repair operations since the 1930s. The site is now the location of a shopping mall, office buildings, parking areas and Hazelhurst Park. Nassau County conducts regular well sampling and analysis of the public supply wells, and EPA is addressing site cleanup through federal actions. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204234 ​ 67. Olean Well Field, Cattaraugus, NY The Olean Well Field is located in Olean, New York. The 1.5-square-mile area includes three public and 50 private wells contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE). Much of the groundwater contamination is believed to be the result of industrial operations at several nearby commercial establishments. Contamination was discovered in 1981. Use of the public wells was discontinued after detection of the TCE and an old surface water filtration plant was reactivated to provide water to city residents. In 1990, the public wells were reactivated after two air strippers were installed to treat the groundwater. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and long-term cleanup efforts are ongoing. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201877 ​ 68. Pasley Solvents & Chemicals, Inc., Nassau, NY The Pasley Solvents and Chemicals site is located in the Town of Hempstead, Nassau County New York. The 75-foot-by-275-foot area is a former tank farm used for the storage of oils, solvents and chemicals. Poor waste handling and storage practices resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater on and off the site property with hazardous chemicals. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in September 2011. A police station is currently located on site. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202422 69. Peninsula Boulevard Ground Water Plume, Nassau, NY The Peninsula Boulevard Groundwater Plume site is a tetrachloroethylene (PCE or perc) groundwater plume in Hewlett, New York. Its source is unknown. The groundwater flows toward the northwest, in the direction of the Long Island American Water Plant 5 Well Field, a source of drinking water. Since April 1991, the Plant 5 well water has been treated by a packed tower aeration system, also known as an air stripper. Remedial design for the site’s groundwater treatment system is underway. EPA is also assessing the site’s source areas. ​ https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204407 ​ 70. Peter Cooper Landfill, Cattaraugus, NY The Peter Cooper site is located in Gowanda, New York. The site was the location of an animal glue and industrial adhesive manufacturing factory. The site’s remedy includes an immediate response to address the source area (the landfill) and long-term cleanup focused on containment of the source and addressing exposure pathways outside the source area. A retaining wall prevents contaminants from reaching Cattaraugus Creek. Past disposal practices, including piling the sludge waste remaining after the animal glue manufacturing process on the northwest portion of the site led to the contamination of the soil. These wastes, known as “cookhouse sludge” because of a cooking cycle that occurred just prior to extraction of the glue, are derived primarily from chrome-tanned hides obtained from tanneries. The waste material has been shown to contain elevated levels of chromium, arsenic, zinc, and several organic compounds. After initial actions to protect human health and the environment, site investigations and cleanup were completed. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201887 ​ 71. Peter Cooper Corporation (Markhams,) Cattaraugus, NY The Peter Cooper Corporation site is located in Dayton, New York. The 106-acre site was an industrial waste disposal area for the Peter Cooper Corporation (PCC), a former animal glue and adhesives plant in Gowanda, New York. The wastes contaminated soil, leachate and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. Contaminants found on site included sludges that contained arsenic, metals and organic compounds. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202124 72. Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Clinton, NY The 3,440-acre former Plattsburgh Air Force Base is located in Plattsburgh, New York. The site is located in a mixed use area consisting of industrial and commercial enterprises, as well as private residences. It is bordered on the north by the Saranac River and the city of Plattsburgh, and on the south by the Salmon River. Lake Champlain, located east of the base, forms approximately one mile of the base boundary. The base began operations in 1955 as a Tactical Wing under the Strategic Air Command of the United States Air Force. It continued operations under that mission until 1991, when it was reassigned as an Air Refueling Wing. The base closed under the Department of Defense (DoD) Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program in 1995. Prior to construction of the Air Force Base, the area occupied by the former base was used by various components of the U.S. military dating back to the Civil War. A history of the site is available on the Plattsburgh Airbase Redevelopment Corporation’s (PARC’s) website at http://www.parc-usa.com . Former Air Force base operations, including aircraft operation, testing and maintenance, firefighting exercises, the discharge of munitions, and landfill operations, generated hazardous wastes that contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater. Cleanup has been ongoing since the 1980’s and is nearly complete. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202439 73. Pollution Abatement Services, Oswego, NY The Pollution Abatement Services (PAS) site is located in Oswego, New York. The PAS facility, a high-temperature, liquid chemical waste, incineration facility, operated on the 15.5-acre property from 1970 to 1977. The facility experienced operational problems and was cited for numerous air and water quality violations by state and federal agencies. Because the incinerator never operated properly, more than 10,000 leaking and deteriorating accumulated on-site, more than a million gallons of oil and mixed hydrocarbons accumulated in three lagoons and contaminated waste oil accumulated in several aboveground and underground storage tanks. As a result, the site soil and groundwater were contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the sediments in the adjacent White and Wine Creeks, which flow into Lake Ontario, were contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The facility was closed in 1977 and the site has been remediated https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201196 74. Port Washington Landfill Nassau, NY The Port Washington Landfill site is located in North Hempstead, New York. The 54-acre area is part of a municipal landfill. The area was a disposal area for construction debris. In 1973, the Town of North Hempstead purchased it and operated a municipal landfill until closing the facility in 1983. Operation of the landfill resulted in an off-site soil gas plume composed of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s remedy was put in place. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202155 ​ 75. Preferred Plating Corp., Suffolk NY Conditions at proposal (October 15, 1984): Preferred Plating Corp. conducted plating operations on a 0.5-acre site in Farmingdale, Town of Babylon, Suffolk County, New York, for more than 20 years, before going out of business in 1976. Since then, several firms have occupied the site. None conducted similar operations to Preferred Plating. An automobile repair shop now occupies the site. From 1955 to 1976, the Suffolk County Department of Health made numerous tests of waste materials contained in open pits. The pits were severely cracked and leaking, allowing discharges into ground water. In 1975, the county identified four major contaminants--copper, chromium, cadmium, and hexavalent chromium. About 15,000 people draw drinking water from wells within 3 miles of the site. The county has taken various court actions through the years to upgrade on-site treatment facilities. The court mandates were never accomplished. In 1976, Preferred Plating filed for bankruptcy. Status (June 10, 1986): EPA is considering various alternatives for this site. For more information about the hazardous substances identified in this narrative summary, including general information regarding the effects of exposure to these substances on human health, please see the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) ToxFAQs. ATSDR ToxFAQs can be found on the Internet at ATSDR - ToxFAQs (http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/index.asp) or by telephone at 1-888-42-ATSDR or 1-888-422-8737. https://semspub.epa.gov/work/02/363587.pdf ​ 76. Ramapo Landfill Rockland, NY The Ramapo Landfill site is located in Ramapo, New York. The 96-acre landfill opened in 1972. In 1978, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) denied the landfill operators an operating permit because of an incomplete permit application and violations of state codes. In addition, unauthorized dumping may have occurred at the landfill. Landfill operations contaminated soil, sediment, surface water and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201191 ​ 77. Richardson Hill Road Landfill/Pond, Delaware, NY The Richardson Hill Road Landfill site is located in Sidney and Masonville, New York. The landfill accepted municipal waste and spent oils from the Scintilla Division of Bendix Corporation (predecessor to Honeywell International, Inc. and Amphenol Corp.) from 1964 to 1969. Landfill operations contaminated soils, sediment, and groundwater with hazardous chemicals. The site consists of two sections–the South Area and the North Area. The South Area contains an 8-acre landfill, South Pond and Herrick Hollow Creek. The North Area includes two small disposal trenches and a manmade surface water body called North Pond. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the long-term groundwater collection and treatment and monitoring are ongoing. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201770 78. Robintech, Inc./National Pipe Co., Broome, NY ​ The Robintech Inc./National Pipe Co. site is located in Vestal, New York. The 12-acre site is an active manufacturing facility. The site property was owned by Robinson Technical Products from 1966 to 1970, Robintech, Inc. from 1970 to 1982, and the Buffton Corporation from 1982 to 2006 (Buffton Corporation changed its name to BFX Hospitality, Inc. in 1996). The site is currently occupied by National Pipe and Plastics, which manufactures polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe from inert PVC resin on site. Facility operations contaminated soils and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are contaminants that evaporate easily in the air. The site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201452 ​ 79. Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard/Dump, Cortland, NY The Rosen Brothers Scrap Yard Dump is an abandoned scrap-metal processing facility which occupies approximately 20 acres on the southern side of the City of Cortland, New York. The site is surrounded by commercial, residential, and industrial properties. The site overlies the Cortland-Homer-Preble aquifer, a sole source aquifer used as a supply of potable water for the City of Cortland. The supply well for the city is located two miles upgradient of the site. The area currently occupied by the site is the eastern half of a forty-acre parcel of land that in the late 1800s was developed by the Wickwire Brothers, Inc. as an industrial facility for the manufacture of wire, wire products, insect screens, poultry netting, and nails. The eastern half of the property was used primarily as a scrap yard. An on-site pond was used as a cooling pond. The facility was sold to the Keystone Consolidated Industries, Inc in 1968. Keystone closed the facility in 1971, and shortly thereafter, the facility was destroyed by fire. In the early 1970s, Phillip and Harvey Rosen transferred their existing scrap-metal processing operation to the eastern portion of the property. The Rosen Brothers demolished the Wickwire buildings and used the debris to fill in most of the cooling pond. The area where the demolition of the buildings took place was cleared for the development of new industry in 1979, known as the Noss Industrial Park. Rosen Brothers' scrap metal operations included scrap metal processing and automobile crushing. Municipal waste, industrial waste and construction waste were allegedly intermittently disposed of in or on the former cooling pond. Drums were crushed on-site, the contents spilling onto the ground surface. The Rosen brothers were cited for various violations, including illegally dumping into Perplexity Creek Tributary, improperly disposing of waste materials, and operating a refuse disposal area without a permit. Operations on the site cease in 198 5, and the site was abandoned. In 1986, the State conducted an investigation of the site and concluded that hazardous materials were present on the site, including several hundred full and/or leaking drums, transformers filled with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and pressurized cylinders of unknown contents. Elevated levels of trichloroethane (TCA), PCBs, anthracene, pyrene, lead, and chromium, in site soil, sediment, and groundwater were detected. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a removal action in 1987. EPA also issued Administrative Orders to Keystone and several additional potentially responsible parties (PRPs) in 1988 and 1989, requiring them to remove the materials previously staged by EPA. This work was completed in April 1990. The site was added to the National Priorities List in March 1989. PRPs conducted a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) from January 1990 to 1997. The PRPs also voluntarily demolished and removed buildings and a smoke stack; removed and recycled 200 tons of scrap materials; emptied and disposed of contents of an abandoned underground storage tank and removed a small concrete oil pit. In August 1997, the EPA removed and recycled over 500 tons of scrap metal and more than 20 tons of tires form the site. A Unilateral Administrative Order was issued in February 1990 and also in March 1998, which required PRPs to perform a removal action. A Record of Decision (ROD) was issued in March 1998. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202609 ​ ​ 80. Rowe Industries Ground Water Contamination, Suffolk, NY The Rowe Industries site is located in Sag Harbor, New York. From the 1950s through the early 1960s, Rowe Industries, Inc. manufactured small electric motors at transformers at the 8-acre area. Solvents stored on the property leaked into the groundwater and formed a 500-foot-wide plume that extended northward to Sag Harbor Creek. Groundwater and soil are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Soil cleanup finished in 2003. Contact with contaminated groundwater and soil is no longer a concern. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202330 ​ 81. Sarney Farm, Dutchess, NY The Sarney Farm site is located in Amenia, New York. A former owner was permitted to use a 5-acre section of the site property as a landfill for municipal wastes. However, industrial and municipal wastes were disposed of at locations across the site from 1965 to 1969. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202088 82. Sealand Restoration, Inc., St. Lawrence, NY The Sealand Restoration, Inc. site is located in Lisbon, New York. A disposal facility for hazardous materials, such as petroleum wastes, operated at the 210-acre area. Groundwater was contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Soils were found to contain low levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, heavy metals and phenols, which are chemicals used to make plastics and detergents. Surface water also was found to be contaminated with metals. Following site investigations, a long-term cleanup remedy was put in place. Under current conditions at the site, potential or actual human exposures are under control. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202090 ​ 83. Shenandoah Road Groundwater Contamination, Dutchess, NY The Shenandoah Road Ground Water Contamination site is located in East Fishkill, New York, in an area known as Shenandoah. The site is an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected residential well drinking water. Tests showed that 60 residential drinking water wells in the area exceeded maximum levels for tetrachloroethene (PCE) and/or trichloroethene (TCE), harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) used in industrial solvents. PCE is considered a potential human carcinogen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the levels detected during testing indicated an immediate threat to public health. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Site cleanup and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204269 84. Sidney Landfill, Delaware, NY The Sidney Landfill site is located in Sidney, New York. The 74-acre area includes a 20-acre former landfill. It accepted municipal and commercial waste, including waste oils, from 1964 until 1972. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201764 ​ 85. Sinclair Refinery, Allegany, NY The 100-acre Sinclair Oil Refinery site is situated between the Genesee River and South Brooklyn Avenue, one-half mile south of downtown Wellsville, in Allegany County, New York. The northerly flowing Genesee River forms the eastern and southern boundaries of the site, South Brooklyn Avenue forms the western boundary, and an old refinery access road forms the northern boundary. The site consists of two areas: a 90-acre refinery area and a 10-acre landfill area. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. A site inspection by EPA, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Atlantic Richfield (ARCO), the site’s potentially responsible party (PRP), in June 2012 confirmed that all systems were operating as designed and are protective of human health and the environment. Environmental easements/restrictive covenants are in place on all the site properties. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202093 86. Smithtown Ground Water Contamination Suffolk, NY he Smithtown Ground Water Contamination site is located in the villages of Nissequogue and Head of the Harbor, and the hamlet of St. James, on Long Island in eastern New York state. The site consists of an area of contaminated groundwater that has affected local drinking water supplies. Groundwater is contaminated with perchloroethylene (PCE), a solvent used in dry cleaning and metal cleaning. EPA connected affected residents to public water supplies and provided bottled water. EPA is also conducting long-term groundwater and surface water monitoring and putting controls in place to restrict the use of contaminated water. During its research, EPA could not identify the source of the contamination or a plume reaching groundwater. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204148 87. SMS Instruments, Inc., Suffolk, NY The SMS Instruments site is located in Suffolk County, New York. The site is the location of an active industrial facility that includes a 34,000-square-foot building on a 1.5-acre lot. The primary operation at the site has been the overhauling of military aircraft components. Overhauling operations include cleaning, painting, degreasing, refurbishing, metal machining and testing. Facility operations contaminated groundwater and soil with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 2010. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201325 88. Solvent Savers, Chenango, NY The Solvent Savers site covers 13 acres in Lincklaen, New York. Solvent Savers, Inc. operated a chemical waste recovery facility at the site for reprocessing or disposal of industrial solvents and other wastes from about 1967 to 1974. Operations included distillation to recover solvents for reuse, drum reconditioning, and burial of liquids, solids, sludges and drums in several on-site areas. Facility operations contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediments and soil with hazardous chemicals. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Cleanup activities and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201687 ​ 89. Stanton Cleaners Area Ground Water Contamination, Nassau, NY The Stanton Cleaners Area Ground Water Contamination site is located in North Hempstead, New York. The quarter-acre area includes an active dry-cleaning business and an adjacent one-story boiler/storage building. As a result of past disposal practices, tetrachloroethene (PCE), a volatile organic compound (VOC), migrated from the subsurface soils into the indoor air environments of nearby buildings and the groundwater, resulting in a significant threat to public health. Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0204167 ​ ​ 90. Tri-Cities Barrel Co., Inc., Broome, NY The Tri-Cities Barrel site is located in Fenton, New York. Used drums were reconditioned at the facility. The wastewater from the cleaning of the drums was discharged into unlined lagoons and allowed to evaporate. After immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201830 91. Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1, Broome, NY The Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1 site is located in Vestal, New York. Well 1-1 is one of three production wells in Water District 1 intended to provide drinking water to several water districts in the Vestal area. The well is moderately contaminated with several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The site also originally included Well 4-2 in Water District 4. However, EPA designated this well as a separate Superfund site, the Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 site, when sampling indicated that two separate sources contaminated Well 1-1 and Well 4-2. Well 1-1 has pumped groundwater into the Susquehanna River since 1980 to prevent the contaminant plume from affecting other District 1 wells. After immediate actions to protect public health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup is ongoing. There are currently no human or environmental exposures to contaminated groundwater and soils. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202228 92. Volney Municipal Landfill, Oswego, NY The 85-acre Volney Landfill site is located in Volney, New York. Landfilling operations took place at an unlined disposal area on site from 1969 to 1983. The landfill accepted wastes from homes, businesses and light industry. However, from 1974 to 1975, the landfill accepted up to 8,000 barrels containing chemical residues from a local hazardous waste treatment facility. Of these, allegedly 200 barrels contained liquids of unknown volume and composition. Also, from 1976 to 1978, the landfill accepted an industrial sludge, which was later identified as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste. Oswego County terminated disposal operations at the landfill in 1983 and finished closure of the site in 1985. After investigations, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Groundwater and leachate treatment and monitoring are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201836 93. Waste Management, Inc Niagara, NY The Niagara County Refuse site is located in the Town of Wheatfield, New York. The 65-acre site is an inactive landfill. The Niagara County Refuse Disposal District operated the landfill from 1969 until 1976, when it was officially closed. Large amounts of municipal and industrial solid and chemical wastes are buried on the site. After closure in 1976, exposed waste was covered with about 20 inches of soil and clay, and the site was graded. The Town of Wheatfield acquired the site in 1976. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2004. Long-term monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201266 94. York Oil Co., Franklin, NY The York Oil Co. site is located in Franklin County, New York. The York Oil Company recycled waste oil at this 17-acre area from 1962 until 1975. Facility operators collected crankcase and industrial oils, some containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), from sources in New England and New York. They stored or processed the oils at the site. The recycled PCB-contaminated oil was sold as No. 2 fuel oil or used in dust control for unpaved roads nearby. During heavy rains and spring thaws, the oil-water mixture in the lagoons would often overflow onto surrounding lands and into adjacent wetlands, which the company purchased in 1964. A state road crew first reported contamination at the site in 1979. After emergency actions to protect human health and the environment, EPA put the site’s long-term remedy in place. Groundwater monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201202 95. Action Anodizing, Plating, & Polishing Corp., Suffolk, NY The Action Anodizing, Plating, and Polishing Corp. (AAPP) site is located in Copiague, New York. Since 1968, AAPP has been the sole operator at the 1-acre site. AAPP’s operations primarily involved sulfuric acid anodizing of aluminum parts for the electronics industry, cadmium plating, chromate conversion coatings, metal dyeing and vapor degreasing. During a site inspection in January 1980 by the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS), it was discovered that rinse water from AAPP’s operations was discharging directly into underground leaching pits. Under the direction and approval of the SCDHS in 1980, AAPP excavated the pits and backfilled them with clean sand and gravel. In 1985, AAPP expanded its building over the location of the former leaching pits. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in 1995. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202634 96. Anchor Chemicals, Nassau, NY The Anchor Chemicals site is located in Hicksville, New York. Chemical blending and packaging operations there led to soil and ground water contamination. In 1995, a short-term cleanup called a removal action dug up and removed about 21 tons of contaminated sediments from four dry wells. Ground water sampling in 1996 and 1997 confirmed that the site no longer poses an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in 1999. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201324 ​ 97. Batavia Landfill, Orleans, NY The Batavia Landfill site is located in Genesee County, New York. From the 1960s until 1980, several operations dumped industrial wastes at the 35-acre landfill, contaminating soils, sediment, surface water and groundwater with metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. Cleanup has included consolidation of contaminated soils and wastes under a multi-layered landfill, collection and off-site disposal of leachate, wetlands restoration and groundwater monitoring. Long-term operation and maintenance activities for the remedy are ongoing. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in November 2005. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201766 ​ 98. BEC Trucking, Broome, NY The BEC Trucking site is located on Stewart Road in Vestal, New York. In the mid-1960s, a trucking company filled in 3.5 acres of marshland with various materials to raise the ground level. BEC Trucking used the property for truck body manufacturing, painting and vehicle maintenance. These operations generated hazardous wastes, which were stored on-site. To clean up the site, the property owner removed waste drums and placed stained soil in storage drums, which the EPA later removed. No other cleanup actions were required. The EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in October 1992. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202235 ​ 99. BioClinical Laboratories, Inc., Suffolk, NY he Bioclinical Laboratories, Inc. (BCL) site is located in Bohemia, New York. The site is a rental property within a 10-unit, single-story building on a 2.6-acre paved lot. BCL formulated, mixed, repackaged and distributed chemicals there from 1978 to 1981. Sampling found a range of organic contaminants, including solvents, in the facility’s sanitary systems. In July 1981, a fire destroyed much of BCL's inventory. Following removal of fire-damaged containers and industrial wastes from the facility’s sanitary systems, EPA determined that no further cleanup was required. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 1994. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202236 ​ 100. C & J Disposal Leasing Co. Dump, Madison, NY The C&J Disposal site is located in the Town of Eaton, Madison County, New York, near the intersection of Routes 12B and 46. The site included a rectangular disposal trench which measured approximately 140 feet by 40 feet. The disposal trench was situated between a former railroad bed and an active agricultural field, and was on property immediately adjacent to residential property owned by C&J Leasing of Paterson, New Jersey. Approximately 100 feet south of where the trench is located is a small pond and adjacent wetlands which drain to Woodman Pond, a back-up water supply for the Village of Hamilton. There are twelve residences in the vicinity and downgradient of the site which use private wells as their source of drinking water. During the 1970s, the trench area was used for the disposal of industrial wastes, although never licensed or permitted for that purpose. In March 1976, C&J Leasing was observed dumping what appeared to be paint sludges and other liquid industrial waste materials into the trench. An inspection of the site by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the Village of Hamilton engineer revealed approximately 100 drums lying in a pool of liquid waste. The trench was subsequently covered with fill, reportedly by C&J Leasing, apparently burying the drums observed in March 1976. Sampling was conducted at the site by NYSDEC in 1985 and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1986. Surficial soil samples obtained from the site revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, phthalates, various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and lead. One of the phthalates, bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and elevated levels of lead were detected in the sediments of the small pond. The site was placed on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) in March 1989. In April 1989, prior to the start of an EPA remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), the site was subject to an unauthorized excavation by the principals of C&J Leasing, leaving two large holes and three stockpiles of soil and waste material. The drums that were believed to have been previously buried may have been removed at this time, or earlier, and taken off-site. An extensive follow-up investigation failed to determine where the drums may have been taken. The site was cleaned up in 1993 and removed from the NPL in 1994. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202366 ​ 101. Clothier Disposal, Oswego, NY The Clothier Disposal site is a 15-acre privately-owned dump site, 6 acres of which were used from the early 1970s to 1984 to dispose of demolition debris, household wastes, junk vehicles, and approximately 2,200 drums of hazardous chemical waste from the Pollution Abatement Services, Inc. (PAS) site, which is also listed on the National Priorities List (NPL). In 1973, the Oswego County Health Department discovered drums containing various amounts of waste from the PAS site at the Clothier Disposal site and reported it to state authorities. In 1976, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) brought a lawsuit against the owner of the property for operating an illegal dump. Subsequently, a temporary permit was granted to clean up the site. From 1977 to 1980, the owner made an attempt to clean up the property. These efforts largely entailed breaking open and draining drums and burying or covering exposed wastes. In 1985, NYSDEC staged and characterized the wastes and drum contents. During these activities, it was discovered that approximately 80 drums were in danger of rupturing; these drums had to be placed in new containers immediately. It was also reported that prior to staging and sampling, up to 90 drums had already ruptured and their contents had leaked onto the ground. The site was listed on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) on June 1, 1996. Residents in the area rely on private wells for drinking water. A wetland passes through the site to the west of the area used for waste disposal. Ox Creek flows through the site, feeding into the Oswego River, and a portion of the site is located within a 100-year flood plain. What is the current site status? The site was addressed through federal and potentially responsible parties' actions in two stages: initial actions and a long-term remedial action focused on cleanup of the entire site. Initial Actions: During 1986, drums were moved to a centralized on-site location. The site’s potentially responsible parties (PRPs), later removed 1,858 drums of waste. In 1987 and 1988, EPA removed remaining drums and visibly-contaminated soil and debris associated with the drums. Long-term Cleanup: In 1989, a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, was completed. The RI/FS concluded that as a result of the removal of the drums and associated contaminated soil, only residual contamination remained. Accordingly, EPA selected a remedy in the site that included regrading and placement of a 1-foot soil cover over residually-contaminated areas and revegetating the site; putting in erosion control measures, as needed, on the embankment sloping toward Ox Creek; institutional controls to prevent the use of the underlying groundwater or any land use involving significant disturbance of the soil cover and long-term ground-water, soil, sediment and surface water monitoring. Following completion of site cleanup activities in 1994, EPA took the site off the NPL in 1996 What's being done to protect human health and the environment? Grading activities for the soil cover uncovered seven drums. The drums and surrounding soil were loaded into dumpsters and removed in 1992. Long-term monitoring and inspection of the site, which started in 1994, led to the discovery of three buried drums. The drums were dug up, overpacked and removed from the site. As a precaution, a limited-area geophysical investigation was undertaken to determine the possible presence of other buried drums. This investigation led to the discovery of buried metallic debris, which was subsequently removed from the site. EPA has since finished four five-year reviews at the site. These reviews ensure that the remedy is protect public health and the environment and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review, completed in March 2013, concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment. Groundwater samples collected in 2014 indicated that the groundwater now meets cleanup standards. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/CurSites/dsp_ssppSiteData1.cfm?id=0201192 ​ 102. Conklin Dumps, Broome, NY The Conklin Dumps site originally consisted of two landfilled areas totaling about 37 acres, referred to as the "Upper Landfill" and the "Lower Landfill." It is believed that only municipal solid waste was disposed of in the Lower Landfill, which was operated between 1964 and 1969. The Lower Landfill contained approximately 33,000 cubic yards of wastes before it was excavated and consolidated with the Upper Landfill in 1993. The Upper Landfill contained approximately 72,000 cubic yards of waste before it was consolidated with the Lower Landfill. It is believed that some industrial wastes were co-disposed with municipal solid wastes in the Upper Landfill. Testing conducted by Broome County found the ground water to be contaminated with heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Leachate from the site drains into Carlin Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna River. Approximately 700 people live within 1 mile of the site. The closest residents live 1/4 mile from the Upper Landfill's boundary. Approximately 2,000 people depend on wells within 3 miles of the site for their drinking water. The area immediately surrounding the Upper Landfill is proposed for development as an industrial park. The U.S. Department of the Interior has designated a large wetland on the site as an important biological resource. Site Responsibility: This site was addressed through federal, state, and municipal actions. What is the current site status? The site was addressed in a single, long-term remedial phase focused on cleanup of the entire site. Long-Term Cleanup: Following a remedial investigation and feasibility study to determine the nature and extent of the contamination and to evaluate remedial alternatives, EPA selected the remedy in the site’s 1991 Record of Decision, or ROD. It included capping the landfills, pumping and collecting leachate, and treating the leachate off site at a publicly owned treatment works. In 1992, EPA updated the remedy to focus on excavation of the Lower Landfill, consolidation of the excavated Lower Landfill contents onto the Upper Landfill, capping of the Upper Landfill, and construction of a leachate collection and treatment system. Following the completion of cleanup activities in 1994, EPA removed the site from the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in May 1997. What's being done to protect human health and the environment? The Lower Landfill was excavated and placed on the Upper Landfill in 1993. The capping of the Upper Landfill finished in 1994. The cap covers about 37 acres. The installation of a leachate collection system and the construction of a pipeline to convey the collected leachate to a local sewage treatment plant finished in January 1996. To date, about 70,000 gallons of leachate has been collected and sent for treatment at the Binghamton-Johnson City sewage treatment plant in Vestal, New York. An estimated 25,000 gallons of leachate will be collected and treated annually for about 30 years, for a total of 750,000 gallons over the life of the project. EPA has conducted four five-year reviews at the site. These reviews ensure that the remedies put in place protect public health and the environment, and function as intended by site decision documents. The most recent review, completed in January 2013, concluded that response actions at the site are in accordance with the remedy selected by EPA and that the remedy continues to be protective of human health and the environment in the short term. For the site’s remedy to be protective in the long term, the review recommends on-site institutional controls to restrict activities that could affect the integrity of the cap, prohibit the residential use of the site property, and prohibit the installation of groundwater wells for drinking or irrigation until groundwater standards are achieved. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/dsp_ssppSiteData1.cfm?id=0202329 ​ 103. Hooker (102nd Street,) Niagara, NY The 102nd Street chemical landfill, is a former chemical landfill located on the Niagara River in Niagara Falls, New York. It is almost immediately adjacent to the infamous Love Canal chemical landfill, which are split from each other by the LaSalle Expressway and Frontier Avenue. Hooker Chemical, a subsidiary of Occidental Petroleum, and Olin Chemical, who were the original owners of the site, were ordered to clean up the site and pay $16,500,000[1] by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. It is a designated Superfund site, and is closed to the public. The 102nd Street landfill consists of two parcels, one owned by Olin Corporation and one owned by Hooker Chemical & Plastics Corporation at an area of 22.1 acres (89,000 m2) total.[2] Unlike Love Canal, which it is directly south of, the facility is still owned by Hooker (Occidental) and Olin, who are in the process of cleaning it up. It is part of the original canal excavation from which the Love Canal landfill takes its name. It currently appears to be a large field, as the chemicals are sealed off and buried underneath the soil. Griffon Park lies directly west, and currently, little residential development lies on either side of the area. The area is monitored with air and ground monitoring devices to measure the toxicity of the site. At an unknown date, chemicals began seeping into the Niagara River. A concrete bulkhead has been constructed on the shore to stop the seepage of chemicals into the river. The area is fenced off on all sides. History The landfill takes its name from 102nd Street, a street that ran through the area before residents were evacuated and homes demolished. The larger portion owned by Hooker was operated from 1943 until 1971.[3] In that time period, 23,500 tons of mixed organic and/or inorganic compounds, solvents and phosphates, and related chemicals were dumped here including brine sludge, fly ash, electrochemical cell parts and related equipment plus 300 tons of hexachlorocyclohexane process cake, including lindane. The smaller portion owned by Olin Corp. operated from 1948 to 1970. 66,000 tons of compounds and elements and an additional 20,000 tons of mercury brine and brine sludge, 1,000+ tons of hazardous chemicals, 16 tons of concrete boiler ash, fly ash and other residual materials were deposited. Currently, the chemicals are sealed off, contaminated soil being removed, and chemicals being removed. The area as of 2008, has been deemed reusable, but no developmental measures have been taken. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/102nd_Street_chemical_landfill ​ 104. Jones Sanitation, Dutchess, NY The Jones Sanitation site is located in Dutchess County, New York. An industrial and septic waste disposal facility operated at the 57-acre area from 1956 to 1977. From the early 1960s through 1979, the landfill accepted industrial liquid wastes and sludges generated by Alfa-Laval, formerly known as the DeLaval Separator Co. of Poughkeepsie. These materials were oils and greases, acids, alkalis, solvents, metals from plating operations, pigments, phenols and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including methylene chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene (TCE). EPA has completed cleanup work and took the site off the Superfund program’s National priorities List. Long-term operation and maintenance activities are ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202045 ​ 105. Katonah Municipal Well, Westchester, NY The Katonah Municipal Well site is located in Katonah, New York. The City of New York (NYC) owns the site property. Well sampling identified several volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are potentially harmful contaminants that easily evaporate in the air. The contamination was traced to a local septic waste collection facility. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 2000. Long-term groundwater treatment and monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202269 106. Marathon Battery Corp., Putnam, NY The Marathon Battery Company site is located in Cold Spring, New York. The 70-acre area includes a now-demolished nickel-cadmium battery plant and 11 surrounding acres, the Hudson River in the vicinity of the Cold Spring pier and a series of river backwater areas known as Foundry Cove and Constitution Marsh. The battery facility operated from 1952 to 1979, producing military and commercial batteries. Facility operations contaminated soil on the plant grounds and adjacent properties and sediments in Foundry Cove, adjacent marshland and the Hudson River with heavy metals and groundwater with a volatile organic compound (VOC). Following immediate actions to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. The EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in October 1996. The site is now ready for reuse. East Foundry Marsh and East Foundry Cove have been acquired by Scenic Hudson, a conservation organization. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201491 107. Niagara County Refuse, Niagara, NY he Niagara County Refuse site is located in the Town of Wheatfield, New York. The 65-acre site is an inactive landfill. The Niagara County Refuse Disposal District operated the landfill from 1969 until 1976, when it was officially closed. Large amounts of municipal and industrial solid and chemical wastes are buried on the site. After closure in 1976, exposed waste was covered with about 20 inches of soil and clay, and the site was graded. The Town of Wheatfield acquired the site in 1976. Following cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2004. Long-term monitoring is ongoing. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201266 ​ 108. North Sea Municipal Landfill, Suffolk, NY The North Sea Municipal Landfill is located in Southampton, New York. The 131-acre North Sea Landfill Superfund site is an inactive municipal landfill owned and operated by the Town of Southampton, New York. The landfill accepted trash, construction debris and septic system waste from 1963 to 1995. The site consists of four areas: Cell No. 1, Cell No. 2, Cell No. 3 and former septic sludge or scavenger lagoons. Site monitoring found that disposal activities resulted in the contamination of groundwater, surface water and soil with heavy metals. Monitoring also found evidence of leachate from the landfill. In 1986, EPA placed the site on the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL). Cleanup activities included closure of Cell No. 1 by constructing a landfill cap and perimeter gas venting system. EPA determined that groundwater required no action because contaminant levels were within EPA's acceptable risk range. All cells are now permanently closed and Cells No. 2 and No. 3 are no longer part of the site. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation regulates those cells under its municipal waste landfill closure program. EPA deleted the site from the NPL in 2005. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202198 109. Radium Chemical Co., Inc., Queens, NY The Radium Chemical Company (RCC) site is located in Queens, New York. The site consisted of an abandoned building on an approximately 1/3 of an acre of land. From the mid-1950s through 1983, RCC operated at the site, leasing specially packaged radium to hospitals for use in the treatment of cancer. When it was abandoned, the facility contained a large quantity of radium-226 sealed in small metal tubes or rods referred to as "needles," totaling about 120 curies. These metal tubes were repackaged to prevent the release of radioactivity and were removed and shipped to a facility in Nevada dedicated to the disposal of radioactive wastes. After these immediate actions were performed to protect human health and the environment, the site’s long-term cleanup took place focusing on the removal of residual radioactivity at the site. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in March 1995. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202850 ​ 110. Suffern Village Well Field, Rockland, NY (REMOVED) The 30-acre Suffern Village Well Field site is located in Suffern, New York. The Village of Suffern operates four production wells that provide water to about 12,000 people at a rate of almost 2 million gallons per day. In 1978, the State detected trichloroethane, a volatile organic compound (VOC), in the public water distribution system. The Tempcon Corporation, a small oil burner reconditioning business, was identified as the source of the contamination. The company is located 2,500 feet uphill of the well field. Until 1979, the company used trichloroethane-based solvents in their process, and discharged waste fluids into a seepage disposal pit.. All residents in the area use municipally supplied water. Site cleanup has been completed. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in May 1993. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202277 111. Syosset Landfill, Nassau, NY (REMOVED) The 38-acre Syosset Landfill site is located in Oyster Bay, New York. The landfill operated from about 1933 to 1975. Between 1933 and 1967, no restrictions were imposed on the types of wastes accepted at the landfill. Waste types included commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, agricultural, sludge material and ash. In 1967, with the opening of another landfill east of Syosset in Old Bethpage, the town stopped using the landfill for disposal of domestically generated wastes. Some industrial wastes continued to be disposed of at the landfill until its closure in 1975. Following the site’s cleanup, EPA took it off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in April 2005. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201187 112. Tronic Plating Co., Inc., Suffolk, NY (REMOVED) The Tronic Plating Co., Inc. site is located in Farmingdale, New York. Tronic Plating occupied the southeastern corner of a long building in an industrial park area from 1968 to 1984. It provided electroplating and metal protective coating services for the electronics industry. The half-acre site consists of the long building, two inside aboveground storage tanks, four underground leaching pools and a storm drain in the paved area northeast of the building. Following site investigations and removal of contaminated waste, EPA determined that the site did not pose a significant threat to human health and the environment. EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List (NPL) in October 2001. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201346 ​ 113. Vestal Water Supply Well, Broome, NY (REMOVED) The Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2 site is located in Vestal, New York. The site is a municipal well contaminated by a bulk chemical handling facility. After contamination was discovered in 1980, the well was taken out of service. The well was returned to service in 1988. The well had been contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are potentially harmful contaminants that can easily evaporate into the air. Similar contaminants were detected in Well 1-1, which is located in Water District 1. The two were originally listed as one Superfund site and were later separated into two Superfund sites: Vestal Water Supply Well 1-1 and Vestal Water Supply Well 4-2. After immediate actions to protect public health and the environment, the site’s long-term remedy was put in place. Following the completed construction of the site’s remedy, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in September 1999. https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0202152 114. Warwick Landfill, Orange, NY (REMOVED) The Warwick Landfill site is located in Warwick, New York. The site is a 19-acre unlined landfill. In the mid-1950s, the Town of Warwick leased the property from the Penaluna family and used the area as a refuse disposal area. Evidence indicates that there were some hazardous materials disposed of at the landfill during this period. The Town of Warwick operated the landfill until 1977, at which time the owner leased it to Grace Disposal and Leasing, Ltd. In 1979, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) sampled leachate seeping from the site and detected volatile organic compounds (VOCs), heavy metals and phenols. New York State subsequently issued a restraining order and closed the landfill. Following investigations, the site’s remedy was put in place. After cleanup, EPA took the site off the Superfund program’s National Priorities List in July 2001. 115. Wide Beach Development, Erie, NY https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201695 https://www.epa.gov/superfund/national-priorities-list-npl-sites-state#NY

  • THE BODY DESCRIBES ITSELF | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE BODY DESCRIBES ITSELF An in-progress painting series started August 2020 by Nina Isabelle. ​ My Grandmother designed leather gaskets used to strap prosthetic limbs onto amputees. Being an athlete and bodyworker, this series of paintings is an inquiry into what the body knows of its own shape and where might this knowledge come from. This is a study to learn how my own body might describe itself with line and paint. ​ Oil on canvas sizes range from 36 - 60 inches Inquire here for details and prices ​

  • NYC Anarchist Art Festival / Judson Memorial Church / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... oUT iN tHE zONE NYC ANARCHIST PERFORMANCE ART EXHIBITION #11 JUDSON MEMORIAL CHURCH, NYC MAY 12, 2017 PHOTOS BY WALTER WLODARCZYK ​ walter-wlodarczyk-2017-05-13-_87A3101 Nina A. Isabelle - Anarchist Performance Art #11 at Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 (photo: Walter Wlodarczyk) walter-wlodarczyk-2017-05-13-_87A3103 Nina A. Isabelle - Anarchist Performance Art #11 at Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 (photo: Walter Wlodarczyk) walter-wlodarczyk-2017-05-13-_87A3085 Nina A. Isabelle - Anarchist Performance Art #11 at Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 (photo: Walter Wlodarczyk) walter-wlodarczyk-2017-05-13-_87A3092 Nina A. Isabelle - Anarchist Performance Art #11 at Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 (photo: Walter Wlodarczyk) walter-wlodarczyk-2017-05-13-_87A3095 Nina A. Isabelle - Anarchist Performance Art #11 at Judson Memorial Church, NYC 2017 (photo: Walter Wlodarczyk) 18319281_318426008575701_4965584380399255762_o

  • SILENT MASS GENERATOR | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE SILENT MASS GENERATOR WORKSHOP GES #411 ARCHIVE SPACE ​ NOVEMBER 6, 2015 The Silent Mass Generator Workshop incorporated the public to assemble, build and incorporate physical mass within an experimental simulated mindfulness environment. The duration of the workshop spanned 5 hours and 44 minutes inside of The Grace Exhibition Space Shirt Factory Studio #411. There was no speaking, eating, or drinking. Participation was not required, participants were free to come and go, or stay for a portion of the workshop. The workshop was designed to distract the subconscious mind by the tedium of cutting, ripping, and tying material to form long strands in order to facilitate the entry into a mindful, meditative, psychic space. The project explored the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint. An experimental soundscape designed with Christina Amelia Diamond acted as an electronic gong wash intended to initiate 23 cycles of ordered energetic body activation using specific Hz. Other auditory Information within the noise composition was generated by The Entity. Speaking was disallowed at The Silent Mass Generator Workshop. The Entity thanks Jeanie Antonelle, Undine Brod, Leonard Fujiyama, Hillary Harvey, Mor Pipman, and Christina Varga for their contribution of materials. CALL FOR MATERIAL DONATIONS ​ SEPTEMBER 25, 2015 The Entity seeks donations of scrap, waste, or unsellable materials such as fabric cut-offs, twine, rolled or spooled material, rope, ribbon, thread, or anything that is in long strands or could be cut and tied to form long strands. The nature of the project has lead to the present development of an official CALL FOR DONATED MATERIALS. The Entity also seeks donations of traditional artist’s materials as well as non-toxic industrial materials which might be repurposed. The upcoming phase of the project includes an opportunity for community participation with an interactive component in the form of a silent workshop intended to build physical mass through the hands-on manipulation of donated material. The workshop will be free and open to the public. FEEDING THE ENTITY ​ MARCH 2015 Feeding The Entity explores the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint.

  • FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FORCE YOURSELF TO BE GOOD Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, NY May 24, 2018 ​ Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL IMG_9611 Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle / /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself to be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL Force Yourself To Be Good Nina Isabelle /Performancy Forum / Panoply Performance Lab / May 24, 2018 / Images provided by PPL

  • ART/LIFE KINGSTON - CLARA & NINA | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ART/LIFE KINGSTON CLARA DIAMOND & NINA ISABELLE 2016

  • Nina A. Isabelle // The Pain Project

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE PAIN PROJECT MARCH 2015 The Pain Project revisits eight physical injuries and is meant as an exploration of where pain is held in the physical body and how it changes with time. Each piece was made by applying paint to paper using the affected body parts. 3rd Metacarpal of Left Hand , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Broken 3rd Metacarpal of Lett Hand: When I was in 3rd grade I broke the 3rd metacarpal on my left hand doing a back-handspring on the trampoline at The Nittany Gymnastics School in State College, PA. Initially I thought that I had just cracked my knuckle in a painful way but later that day when I was asked by my instructor to do a glide kip on the bars I noticed that there was a sharp pain in my hand. My instructor assumed that I was lying in order to get out of class. I felt conflicted by her accusation, so I tried to swing from the bars again but it was still painful. Was I imagining it? Maybe I just hated doing gymnastics? I began to question my perception of pain within my physical body, I couldn’t tell if I was hurt. That night I told my Mom that I thought I had hurt my hand. She said she would take me to have an x-ray in the morning, but my Dad told her it was not broken, there wasn’t enough swelling, to leave me alone and it would be fine. They fought about it but she took me anyway and it turned out to be broken. They wrapped it up with a plaster cast. Frontalis Bone , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Multiple Concussions: Due to skateboarding and snowboarding I have been knocked unconscious several times. Once I hung up and fell to my head on a mini-ramp and was knocked out for several seconds. When I opened my eyes a man who was there said “Don’t move, I’m going to get your Dad.” I didn’t move. When the man came back he said, “Your Dad says to get up, that you’ll be fine.” The first time I dropped in on a vert ramp everyone told me, “Make sure you lean forward!” I dove from the top of the 12 foot ramp to the bottom, landing head first. I felt dizzy and was giddy but thought it would be a good idea if I tried again. Everyone was yelling “just sit down, don’t get up!” I tried again. On the way home I felt nauseous, my friend had to drive, I threw up on the side of the road. The worst time was when I dropped in on an 7 foot quarter pipe that went onto an asphalt street course. My wheel ran into a piece of gravel and it caused my board to stop rolling, I fell right onto the front of my head. Right in my hairline, directly above my right eye, a large lump instantly grew straight out of my skull, like when cartoon characters get hit with a bat. I had a lump that was as tall as a spool of thread sticking straight out of my head, like a horn! I couldn’t stop laughing, time was distorted, I was delirious. The person I was with took me to the E.R. I had a concussion, they said to wake me up every two hours. The lump turned to dark colors, and then eventually drained into both my eye sockets. I had two black eyes, like a raccoon. I was in Art school at the time, my painting teacher took me aside and asked if I was experiencing domestic violence, he was convinced that my boyfriend was beating me, I couldn’t stop laughing. My skull is indented in that spot. To this day If I touch it with my finger my heart starts racing and my throat clenches shut and it becomes hard to breath. Right Hip , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Multiple contusions on right thigh, inferior lateral aspect of the greater trochanter of femur : At age 14 I was doing a balance beam trick called a Gainer Layout Step, where you sort of fling yourself up in the air and do a no-handed flip and land on one foot. I missed my landing foot and landed on the lateral aspect of my thigh resulting in a giant black and blue mark. Shortly after that I was required to have a physical for school, the nurses saw my bruises and asked if I “had a happy home life.” They sent me to the school counselor who asked me if I drank or used drugs or if I had been exposed to domestic violence. She didn’t believe my answer, that I had “fallen off a balance beam.” Many years later, I was doing a 50/50 grind around a bowl corner on my skateboard, and when I went to go back in my back trucks hung up on the coping, causing me to slam into the bottom of the 5 foot deep bowl with full force, directly onto my right hip. It swelled up instantly, looking like an enormous raspberry scone stuck to my thigh. Blood and yellow fluid began to push out of my pores and flow down my leg. I’d wake up with the bed sheets stuck to my thigh each night, eventually there was a scab the size of my entire hand. My thigh was swollen fat and wiggly like it was full of jello. I couldn’t put on pants and had to wear skirts for weeks, I had an unbelievably huge and disgusting scabby, black-and-blue thigh. To this day, over 20 years later, I still have a lump of scar tissue the size of a small lemon inside my lateral thigh. It is still surprisingly painful to touch. I call it my “perma-bruise.” Lateral Malleolus of Right Fibula , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Undiscovered Broken Lateral Malleolus of the Right Fibula : I had sprained my right ankle several times doing gymnastics, it usually took 3-4 week to feel completely better. The usual protocol involved sticking my foot in a bucket of ice water several times a day, continuing to try to walk on it so that I wouldn’t loose mobility, and wrapping it tightly with athletic tape so that I could get back to training as soon as possible. I had been through this injury several times. When I was 15 I took up skateboarding instead of gymnastics. One time I dropped in off of a ledge that went to a bank and my front right foot rolled under. I wound up landing on top of my crumpled foot with all of my weight from several feet in the air. It was so painful, I was frozen and unable to make a sound or move. Nobody in the crowded building recognized that I was injured. I slowly and quietly moved myself across the concrete floor toward the exit and crawled on one knee with my ankle in the air, very delicately and smoothly, down the hill to where the athletic trainers were. They looked at my ankle and said I would need to get an x-ray, then I was given a ride home. I called my Dad, who said “No, you don’t need an x-ray, it’s probably just a bad sprain, just ice it.” 4 weeks had gone by and I was still not able to put much weight on my foot. I kept trying to walk normally, and just wrapped it up tightly with athletic tape. It was over 2 months before I could walk without pain. My boss and other people implied that I was faking an injury for special attention, so I made a point to conceal my pain. When I was 36 I sprained my ankle again while bouldering. I had it x-rayed and they said, “It’s not broken now, but we can see where it has been broken previously in several places.” My ankle has never recovered from this, it is extremely sensitive and I can’t allow anything to touch it, the lightest tap makes me yelp. Dragging it across the paper for this project was excruciating, I almost cried. This injury is 18 years old and has not left my body yet. Occipital Bone , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Bad Neck Injury: I’m not sure what happened to my neck. I over-rotated a double back flip on the trampoline and was about to land on the back of my head. My friend dove toward me to stop my rotation before I landed but his fist wound up right in the back of my neck when I landed with my feet crumpling over the top of my body. My entire head and neck were tingling and making crackling sounds, it felt like fluid had been blasted up my nose. I crawled off the trampoline and took myself home. I took some Advil, put a bag of frozen peas on my neck and tried to sleep. I couldn't move for days, the phone had been ringing but I couldn't get to it. I finally crawled to the kitchen 2 days later to eat, but wound up on the floor in pain. I made an appointment with a chiropractor but he needed to see an x-ray. I didn't have insurance so I just waited for it to get better. I have a lump the size of a walnut at base of my occipital bone on my right side. It hasn’t gone away yet, sometimes I have sharp, shooting pains if I turn my head a certain way. Contusions on Lungs , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Contusions on Lungs, Cracked Tooth: When I was 16 I was snowboarding on an icy slope with my friend. Something happened and I wound up in the air face-first and landed on my chest and face. I knocked the wind out of myself and banged the front of my face and head onto the ice. I started laughing really hard, blood gurgled up from my throat and sprayed onto the snow, then I spat a tooth into my mitten, I couldn’t stop laughing. My friend asked if I was okay and I couldn’t stop laughing, I said that I was okay, but he took me to the hospital. They x-rayed my lungs because of the blood coming out of my throat, it had a contusion. The next day I went to the dentist and he made me a new tooth out of putty, I still have it. Lateral Deltoid 44x36, tempera paint on paper Separated Right Shoulder: When I was 16 I was skateboarding on a 5 foot mini ramp inside of a metal building near my home. My back trucks hung up on the coping and I fell to the flat bottom landing on my shoulder. I tried to leave the building but couldn't open the door because I needed to hold my right arm onto my body with my left arm. I tried for a while to open the door with my foot, or to unlatch and slide the barn doors open with my legs. Eventually I managed to open the door and walked home. My parents were upset with me for being late for dinner. My Dad gave me a sling for my arm, and we tied my arm to my torso for several days until it tightened back onto my body. Sacrum / Coccyx , 44x36, tempera paint on paper Possible broken or subluxed coccyx or sacrum: My skateboard slid out from under me and I landed on my tail bone on a metal pipe. I was able to get home and go to bed. In the morning I was in so much pain, I couldn't stand upright. I walked slowly, bent over all the way, to the bathroom, then back to my bed. My parents didn’t know I was hurt. They kept yelling for me to “Make sure you don’t miss dinner at camp, we don’t have any food at the house!” I couldn’t get out of bed, I was so hungry. I never saw a doctor.

  • HiLo Catskill / Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... Nina Isabelle Opening at HiLo CATSKILL, NY ​ MAY 2017 Nina Isabelle, with her signature gusto, will be presenting an evening of intrigue, education, and hullabaloo. Arm wrestling, The Overconfident Autodidact (performed by Erik Hokanson,) a tea party performance by Valerie Sharp, a public interview with the questioner another performance artist (Matthew Gioia,) and two documentary screenings- The Eucharist Machine and Time Travel Research Documentary.. Nina Isabelle's installation will be at HiLo from now until June 5. It can be viewed M-F 7am-2pm and Sat & Sun 9am - 4pm until May 3rd after which time the hours will be M-Tu 7-2, W-Th 7 -4, Fri 7am-12am, Sat 7-12am, Sun 9am - 10pm

  • FEEDING THE ENTITY | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... FEEDING THE ENTITY MARCH 2015 Clara Diamond & Nina Isabelle Feeding The Entity explores the development and agenda of interwoven notions of communal beliefs, material dynamics, possibilities of non-linear physical travel implied through numbers expressing location using longitude and latitude, the metaphor of breath in relation to inspiration and language styles expressing give-and-take or push/pull communication patterns, the articulation of verbal concepts in relation to the movement between ball-and-socket joints such as the hips and shoulders during the birthing-process, as well as the documentation of scientifically unsubstantiated effects of focused intention and ritual action in non-physical reality such as memory, deja-vu, and other phenomena of psychic imprint.

  • Roman Susan // PROPERTY // RPWRHS // Nina A. Isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... PROPERTY ROMAN SUSAN & ROGERS PARK / WEST RIDGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY APRIL 1, 2017 TELLERS I The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of the Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. 20x30 NINA A. ISABELLE February 2017 TELLERS II The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of the Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. 20x30 NINA A. ISABELLE February 2017 ALONG THE WAY Streicher and friends have been displaced. Transported by a drunken maritime time traveling expedition, the three men find themselves near the Chicago surface line sign at 2100 W Touhy Avenue. Peter Van Iderstein's boat, launched at at Greenleaf Avenue and Lake Michigan, has been repurposed as a time traveling vessel. NINA A. ISABELLE 20x30 February 2017 Roman Susan Art Foundation and the Rogers Park/West Ridge Historical Society will present a collaborative exhibit in Spring 2017 reflecting the way neighborhoods emerge and change as a result of land development. For this project, the Historical Society has placed 100 images from the Rogers Park/West Ridge photography archive into the creative commons. The exhibition will include repurposed and reimagined responses to the historical photographic archive. ​ View the full selection of images dating from 1870 to 2005 here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rpwrhs/sets/72157676302462950/ The selection of original images include photographs donated to the Historical Society from the collections of Leonard and Lillian Adler, Katherine Allen (née Dittmar), LeRoy Blommaert, Lillian M. Campbell, Ann Davis Dix, Gail Donovan, Paul and Jean Einsweiler, Fred Elisius, Dorothy Ferguson, Stephen C. Ferguson, Howard Frink, John Peter Geroulis, Ken Gustafson, Elizabeth Habman, Gladys Hoaglund (née Van Iderstein), Maryl Hook, Leslie Keeling (née Pollard), Anthony Kingman, James and Sally Kirkpatrick, Carmen Lara, Rasmus Larson, James C. McCabe, J. Curtis Mitchell, William Morton, Margaret Mary Muno, Marcella Polonsky, Jean R. Price, Sidney and Ann Rockin, Marie Roti (née Bornhofen), Richard Schaul, Grant Schmalgemeier, Marty Schmidt, Toni Sherman (née Albanese), George and Margot Striecher, Mel Thillens, Sr., Ceal Thinnes, Mary Thiry (née Mertens), Albert and Loretta Weimeskirch, Gerald Wester, John Winkin, the American Legion Rogers Park Post #108, Angel Guardian Orphanage, B'nai Zion Synagogue, George Buchanan Armstrong School of International Studies, Cook County Federal Savings & Loan, Devon Bank, Mundelein College (Loyola University Chicago), North Town Public Library, Rogers Park Women's Club, Philip Rogers School, RREEF Management Company, S&C Electric Company, St. Margaret Mary Archives, and Sullivan High School. ​ Tellers I The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of The Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. Tellers II The women and girls from St. Henry's First Communion at 6235 N Hoyne Ave predict the future of The Devon Bank at 6445 N Western Avenue. Along The Way Streicher and friends have been displaced. Transported by a drunken maritime time traveling expedition, the three men find themselves near the Chicago surface line sign at 2100 W Touhy Avenue. Peter Van Iderstein's boat, launched at at Greenleaf Avenue and Lake Michigan, has been repurposed as a time traveling vessel.

  • VOICES & CHOICES | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ​ The Ear, Brooklyn, NY August 23rd 2019 VOICES & CHOICES Referencing the ways misperceptions of fear, safety, danger, pain and the body create difficulty when voicing choices, this performance was an exercise in decision making, speaking up, and the difficulty that surrounds these things. I welded a steel cage for my body that was also a percussion instrument to be played on and off the body. I constructed and wore a garment of half visually reflexive material and half acoustically absorbent foam. The performance audio included partially told stories, inaudible language, and uncomfortable loud sounds. Curated by Polina Riabova and organized by Oya Damla at The Ear in Brooklyn, NY. Photos by Kira DeCoudres

  • JOB // F.A.G. | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... LAUNDRY LOOPS (JOB) ​ IV SOLDIER'S F.A.G. (FEMINIST ART GROUP) PANOPLY PERFORMANCE LABORATORY ​ NOVEMBER 3, 2016 (Lorene Bouboushian, IV Castellanos, Amanda Hunt, Kaia Gilje, Nina Isabelle) Photos: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle LAUNDRY LOOPS // JOB // F.A.G. //PPL Laundry Loops JOB // IV Soldier's F.A.G. at Panoply Performance Laboratory November 3, 2016 Photo: Brian McCorkle 1/2

  • MKULTRA / MIND CONTROL RABBIT

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE GIANT MK ULTRA MIND CONTROL RABBIT PLAYS MKUVM Duration: 14 min. 44 sec. Created February 2017 The MKUVM audio file functions as human behavior modification designed to disarm protective fear-based reality programming in order to insert dangerous encrypted emotional directives disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from ex-lovers. The audio file utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. ​ Tags: Electronic Harassment, Magnetoencephalography, Mind Control, Behavior Control, LSD, CIA,MK/Ultra, Physicochemical Investigations, Voicemail, Infrasound, Secure Room, Microwave Auditory Effect, Bobolocapnine, Atlanta Federal Penitentiary Prisoner Experiments, Richard Bandler Murder Trial, NLP, Neuro-linguistic Programming, Ex-Lovers, Energy Weapons, Sonic Weapons, Satan, Behavior Modification, The Manchurian Candidate, Brainwash, Backmasking, Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments. Giant MK Ultra Mind Control Rabbit This sculpture is designed to disarm protective fear-based reality program in order to insert dangerous encrypted information disguised as electronically modified and degraded voicemails from x-lovers. The sculpture utilizes technology developed by the CIA's MKUltra programs and experiments.

  • TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... TEN THOUSAND OBJECTIVES I was interested in trying to figure out how the body knows what it knows — specifically, the somatic experience of tangible material, the cognitive experience of intangible concepts, and the interplay between these four variables. I was also interested in how repetition seems to create the potential to sidestep consciousness, and I wanted to experiment with that notion to see if I could access different modes of perception or ways of knowing by engaging in a repetitive action for an extended length of time. In setting up the framework for this performance, I mapped out and identified all the parameters that I was able to. I decided on the timeframe and squared off the surface area of my work space. This gave me a way to control the tangible aspects of the performance. By laying out this semi-structured plan, I hoped to create a situation where intangibles and surprises could occur. Starting in the middle of an eighteen foot square of floor space, I set out to make one thousand pinch pots within a span of four hours. I imagined the pots would fill the entire work space and somehow be equally distributed. I counted the pots as I went along and kept track of them in ten groups of ten — something I realized was necessary as I went along and realized would be the only way for me to know when I was done. I was surprised to find that, at the end of the four hours, and down to within a few minutes, I had made the exact amount I set out to make. While I was working, the span of four hours seemed to shrink down to about the feeling of twenty minutes. These are the types of perceptive phenomena I’m interested in working with and demonstrating. How did these things happen so exactly with such little planning? How and why does time seem to stretch or contract depending on levels of engagement, intention, and focus? ​ Things can be objects or subjects. While objects are tangible things abstracted from the particularness of subjects, subjects are the intangible concepts or notions we extract from objects. How do we process the intangible sense data we extract from encountering objects made of particles in the physical dimension and what do we call this process? What are the internal mechanisms we use to govern how we locate and position our physical selves in relation to objects in space? ​ For this project, I constructed and deconstructed a batch of 10,000 intangible and tangible subjects and objects as a way to set both their physical and nonmaterial aspects free. Through forming a set of 1,000 physical objects made of clay with my hands, the conceptual intangibleness of their essence was simultaneously set free and bound as it transformed into material form. Conversely, intangible concepts were released from physicality through the gestural motions accompanied by the transmutation of 9,000 subjects into nonmaterial objects. Equinox: EMERGENCY OF JOY - 10,000 THINGS SET FREE ​ Seventy one artists from around the world work together remotely and simultaneously over the spring Equinox. Organized by Chelsea Burton, Rae Diamond, Erik Ehn, Brenda Hutchinson, Suki O’Kane, “Ten thousand is rooted in the Buddhist concept of the ten thousand dharmas – an image for all observable reality." ​ MARCH 19, 2020 11:49 PM EST - MARCH 20, 2020 1:49 AM EST (Equinox at 11:49 PM EST) ​

  • ACTIVATING PERCEPTION | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... ACTIVATING PERCEPTION - NINA A. ISABELLE MIDTOWN ARTS DISTRICT by Debra Bresnan May 10, 2017 ​ https://madkingston.org/2017/05/09/nina-a-isabelle/ ​ When did you first know you were an artist? Growing up people referred to me as an artist and so I became one – an experience that made me aware of the power of language, perception, belief, and social programming, all themes in my current work. It’s possible that if I had grown up in a different environment I might have been an engineer because as an artist I’m always working with how things like concepts of memory and phenomena articulate with visual and spatial perception, language, materials, and meaning and how to build generative dialogue between these factors. Where an engineer might work with materials, data, or electricity, as an artist I use a similar approach but with different variables. ​ Favorite medium(s) you use to make art? My favorite art medium is probably the phenomena of perception and how language builds reality. Right now my focus is on working to manipulate and bend notions surrounding the value and usefulness of art away from commodity and towards structures that represent essential and social value. Inside of this, working with painting I can still have an intention to study gesture, motion, and look for new languages that might emerge from this action and mark making or find new information in whatever emerges. I like to get my hands on chunks of materials like vats of clay, lumber, bolts of fabric, or discarded machine parts and sort of grapple with the stuff until it gives in to another form. Sometimes I might start out with an intention or give myself an assignment, but other times I let myself generate information by engaging with materials and paying close attention as I go. ​ Since I work pretty equally with photography, video, design, performance, installation, and painting, nothing is really off limits to me. I grew up at a summer camp for kids where we had an arts and crafts department with a ceramics studio, photo lab, leather tools, batik, enamels, silk screens, and fabric dye, among others. Nine months out of the year these departments were vacant and I really made the best of it – I learned to use the kiln and glazes by haphazardly blowing up and melting a lot of stuff, mixing chemistry by taste, a lot of other experimental and dangerous learning-by-doing that has carried over to my current approach. I never read instructions as a younger person because I couldn’t really read until I went to college. I’m rarely intimidated by new things, and I think that’s one of my favorite things about my development and approach. What are the most interesting new trends in your field? Is your work changing as a result? One of the most exciting things I notice right now is a shift toward recognizing the social value of art as a tool to reframe reality through community building, open sourcing ideas and data, and through things like artist collectives and working together with other artists and community members. In the art world, there are always these superficial fads like geometric shapes or graffiti, or some new trendy material, or something everyone is doing like such-and-such, but my work doesn’t usually wind up aligning itself with those sorts of cultural flows. I don’t usually find myself in trendy circles — something that has made it difficult to find a community but also has led me to the point where I am now. I recognize that, all along, my running mission has been to challenge outmoded institutional and economic systems that have grown regulated and insular and to work to build systems to replace these. Artists are always pressing hard against hierarchal structures like gender, race, and social class: It seems like the discord generated by our new political administration is influencing a lot of art thinking these days. ​ Talk about your creative process ­– where/when do you get most of your ideas and how do you know a piece is ‘finished’? My creative process is rooted pretty firmly in letting myself respond instinctively. One thing I often find myself doing is trying to destroy rosy notions that abound around creativity being “beautiful.” Being a person who has given birth to babies I recognize the mess, blood, and pain that goes along with creativity. I have a lot of ideas and mostly I choose to go with the ones that make me laugh about myself or our collective idiocy. I also like to work with themes that irk me such as fake systems of legitimization we use to determine success, such as university degrees, financial values and the gender and power imbalances that seem to perpetually skew the art world. ​ Making art objects like paintings and sculptures, and grappling with material and concepts together, I’ve questioned the point of it beyond decoration or commodity and have come to understand my process as a personal tool that lets me understand reality in a way that I can integrate. Working with materials and visual information puts me in touch with deeper threads of meaning, and nuances of life that fortify the tapestry. I’m drawn toward this way of working and thinking because there seems to be something I can’t quite say in writing or speaking, something linear language can’t quite get at. I don’t know what it is yet and that’s what keeps me engaged. ​ As far as recognizing when something is finished, I think it’s just a matter of paying attention to a subtle feeling of “doneness,” or arriving at a comfortable stopping point or a feeling of resolve – like I’ve figured something out or said what I meant to say. Sometimes a stopping point might never come because maybe I’ve gone down on a dead-end path. I have a lot of projects in limbo because they’ve become overwhelming or I’ve lost interest, things I can always get back to at any point. And, in a quantum way, things can never be finished because time isn’t linear and there’s no such thing as an end point. ​ Do you also teach or are you strictly a creative artist? Who was your most influential mentor and why? How do you see the role of being a mentor? and why? In the past, I’ve taught art classes like photography, modern dance, and painting or movement workshops. There is always a technical entry point where students spend time learning about say, the camera machine, visual mechanics, basic movement patterns, or just becoming familiar with materials, and this can be a fun and engaging way for people to come together. But I always want to move further into dialogue about how the usefulness of these art tools and practices can be more than a fun pastime or therapeutic hobby. Art offers invaluable ways to shift perception and find new vantage points. As an artist, I collaborate with others in several capacities that seem more like mutual mentorship, where we share and build upon each other’s momentum and concepts. I’m not sure that I’ve ever fit the part of strictly a mentor to another, but I do recognize people who’ve inspired me. I had a couple high school teachers who helped me to evade attendance, something that in a typical case might not sound helpful, but I really recognize and value people who have taken risks in order to do the right thing morally. School is not a good place for all children. ​ I can’t say that I’ve ever had a strong relationship with an individual mentor, but something that intrigued me early on was finding and building obscure relationships between seemingly unrelated artists and their work. I remember wondering about Käthe Kollwitz’s Woman With Dead Child in relationship to Henry Moore’s sculptures and sheep sketchbook, and Jim Dine’s Robes. Somehow the similar volume expressed in these works was curious to me, possibly as a subconscious desire to connect the physical form of my body to their work because I’ve always been athletic. I was also intrigued by industrial design and how humans interact with tools and objects, especially mid-century chairs like the Eames Lounger and Bertoia’s designs as a framework for simultaneously supporting physical and thought forms together. So in a way, I’ve let this sense of wonder guide me. What are you working on now? For the past year, I’ve been working on a project called The Superfund Re-Visioning Project . It’s an experimental framework that aims to transform contaminated industrial sites recognized by The United States Government as Superfund Sites. In New York State there are 117 of these sites. I’m developing a project that aims to create a platform for artists and community members who might otherwise be marginalized by political and financial systems that typically deal with these sorts of remediation. ​ I’m also involved with an artist collective developed by IV Castellanos called The Feminist Art Group (F.A.G.) from Brooklyn, and plan to invite them to Kingston this summer for one of The Shirt Factory Open Studio events. Currently, I have a show at the new HiLo gallery space in Catskill and like to participate in local shows at The Old Glenford Church Studio . I think it’s great when things like The UNITY show curated by Sarah Carlson and Lisa Barnard Kelley between the artists at The Shirt Factory and The Lace Mill come together to fortify community connectedness. Upcoming, I have work being featured by The Unstitute in Catalunya, Spain and plan to do something fun at Paul McMahon’s Mothership Gallery this fall. Recently my focus is moving into sound and auditory perception. I’ve become interested in digitally degraded sound snippets and obscuring auditory input to the point of noise in a way to find out what’s behind and within the experience of sound. ​ For more information about my work and listings of recent/current exhibitions, projects and collaborations, please visit www.ninaisabelle.com/cv . ​ How has being in Kingston enhanced/inspired your work? What do you like best about living in Kingston/being involved with MAD? How long have you been here? Kingston has a lot to offer artists and community members and is building momentum as an arts-branded district. Recently we’ve seen several exciting places pop up like David Schell’s Green Kill , Rilley Johndonnell’s Optimism concept, Broadway Arts , The Art/Life Institute on Abeel Street , and Kingston High School Art teacher Lara Giordano, who is exhibiting student work at PUGG on Broadway. The surrounding landscape is diverse and inspiring conceptually because of the Hudson River waterways, The Catskill Mountains, The Ashokan Reservoir, and the surrounding forests, hiking, and rail trails. The Mid-Hudson Library system is phenomenal, and it’s easy to travel back and forth to New York City from Kingston. It’s great to have artist studio spaces like The Shirt Factory and The Lace Mill which offer affordable living spaces for artists, and especially new organizations like MAD that are forming to support this new movement. ​

  • CERTAIN SOLUTIONS | nina-isabelle

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... CERTAIN SOLUTIONS FOR DISSOLVING PROBLEMS CZONG INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART GIMPO, KOREA / AUGUST , 2016 Certain Solutions For Dissolving Problems August 21, 2016 8:39 Certain Solutions For Dissolving Problems compiles digital imagery, audio, photography, and writing from The Superfund Re-Visioning Project into a video that addresses the failure of language and processes used to confront social and political issues such as environmental contamination. Using subtle neurolinguistic programming tactics combined with inaudible frequencies this video implants the idea of psychic reprogramming as a possible solution to artistic process displacement and underutilized artistic visions within the financial and political structures intended to remediate environmental contamination. In September 2016 Certain Solutions for Dissolving Problems was exhibited in an exhibition called Artist and Location at The Czong Institute For Contemporary Art in Gimpo, Korea.

  • Nina A. Isabelle / The Giant Weed Web at Rosekill Performance Art Farm

    HOME ABOUT PROJECTS THREE PHASE CONTACT SEARCH More... THE GIANT WEED WEB IV SOLDIER'S F.A.G. (FEMINIST ART GROUP) at ROSEKILL SEPTEMBER 2016 ​ Feminist Art Group founder IV Castellanos of IV Soldiers Gallery curates a group of artists at Rosekill Performance Farm in Rosendale , NY for a weekend of building and performance. Elizabeth Lamb, Kaia Gilje, Amanda Hunt, Lorene Bouboushian, Nina Isabelle, Quinn Dukes, Anya Liftig, IV Castellanos, Jill McDermid, Claribel Jolie Pichardo.

N I N A  A. I S A B E L L E 

bottom of page